cytology

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cytology

 [si-tol´o-je]
the study of cells, their origin, structure, function, and pathology. adj., adj cytolog´ic.
aspiration biopsy cytology (ABC) the microscopic study of cells from superficial or internal lesions obtained by aspiration biopsy.
exfoliative cytology microscopic examination of cells desquamated from a body surface or lesion, done to detect malignancy or microbiologic changes, to measure hormonal levels, and for other purposes. The cells may be obtained by such procedures as aspiration, washing, smear, and scraping, and the technique may also be applied to secretions such as sputum, urine, abdominal fluid, prostatic secretions, and vaginal secretions.

cy·tol·o·gy

(sī-tol'ō-jē),
The study of the anatomy, physiology, pathology, and chemistry of the cell.
[cyto- + G. logos, study]

cytology

(sī-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of biology that deals with the formation, structure, and function of cells.

cy′to·log′ic (-tə-lŏj′ĭk), cy′to·log′i·cal adj.
cy·tol′o·gist n.

cytology

Cell biology
The biology of structure, function, multiplication, pathology, and history of cells. In the working parlance, “cell biology” is preferred to “cytology,” given the obvious potential for confusion with health professionals (cytologists and cytotechnologists) who examine cell specimens to render clinical diagnoses. Those who study such phenomena are called cell biologists, not cytologists.

Medspeak
The formal discipline in which cells are studied and the changes seen correlated with the clinical findings in patients.
 
Pathology
The microscopic examination of body fluids for the detection of disease; in cytology, the most common specimen is the Pap smear, a normal component of a gynaecologic examination which is the best means of detecting early, curable stages of cancer of the uterine cervix—formerly the most common cause of death in sexually active women—as well as viral, fungal and other infections of the female genital tract. Cytology specimens can be obtained from various fluids (urine, CSF, or sputum or discharges) specifically as a means of detecting abnormal or malignant cells.

cytology

1. The formal discipline in which cells are studied and the changes seen correlated with the clinical findings in Pts.
2. Cytologic examination, cytologic study The microscopic examination of body fluids for the detection of disease; in cytology, the most common specimen is the Pap smear, a normal component of a gynecologic examination and is the best means of detecting early, curable stages of cancer the uterine cervix–formerly the most common cause of death in sexually active ♀ as well as viral, fungal and other infections of the ♀ genital tract; cytology specimens can be obtained from various fluids–urine, CSF, or sputum or discharges, specifically as a means of detecting abnormal or malignant cells. See Aspiration cytology, Automated cytology, Bile cytology, Brush cytology, Exfoliative cytology, Fine needle aspiration cytology, Needle aspiration cytology, Ocular cytology, Pap smear, Screening, Touch cytology, Urine cytology.

cy·tol·o·gy

(sī-tol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the anatomy, physiology, pathology, and chemistry of the cell.
Synonym(s): cellular biology.
[cyto- + G. logos, study]

cytology

1. The study of cells.
2. An abbreviation of the phrase ‘exfoliative cytology’ the examination of isolated cells, obtained from cervical smears, sputum or elsewhere, to determine whether or not they are cancerous.

cytology

the study of cells.

cytology 

A study of cells to detect diseases. The usual procedure is to obtain a sample, to fix it on a glass slide, treat it with various dyes and inspect it under a microscope. Differential staining allows identification of the cells and their state of health.

cy·tol·o·gy

(sī-tol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the anatomy, physiology, pathology, and chemistry of the cell.
[cyto- + G. logos, study]
References in periodicals archive ?
An exploratory single-agent cabozantinib cohort and exploratory single-agent atezolizumab cohort with patients with metastatic CRPC who have histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the prostate after prior treatment with one NHT for CSPC or metastatic CRPC are being added.
Caption: Figure 5: TGF-[beta]1 (a) and IL-10 (b) concentrations in three cytologically determined groups of pleural effusions: malignant effusions with malignant cells (I), malignant effusions without malignant cells (II), and nonmalignant pleural effusions (III).
By contrast, false negatives seldom appeared; as a proof of concept, 98% of cytologically malignant LNs (n=61) showed at least one morphological alteration (shape, margins, echogenicity, vascularization, L >19 mm, short axis >11 mm).
Cytologically proven axillary lymph node metastases are eradicated in patients receiving preoperative chemotherapy with concurrent trastuzumab for HER2-positive breast cancer.
In this study, histologically diagnosed 8 (0.7%) cases of SCC, 12 (63.1%) cases of verrucous carcinoma and 2 cases of adenoid cystic carcinoma were initially given as cytologically negative (FN) for malignancy whereas 66 (4.3%) lesions were unsatisfactory or inadequate on evaluation by cytology, which was comparable to other studies by Gupta et al.
Though not commonly performed or recommended in the evaluation of thyroid nodules, fludeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been reported to have a high NPV when applied to the diagnosis of cytologically indeterminate thyroid nodules.
This case highlights a pitfall possible with commercially available polyclonal PAX8 immunostains and the need for adequate viable tissue to discriminate between two potentially clinically and cytologically similar entities with very different prognosis and therapy.
Thyroglossal duct cysts that do not contain cholesterol crystals and squamous cells in the smear are not cytologically different from colloidal-cystic nodules of the thyroid gland.
Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) or extra-abdominal desmoid tumours are rare tumours of fibroblastic origin involving the proliferation of cytologically benign fibrocytes.1 AF accounts for about 0.03% of all neoplasms and >3% of all soft tissue tumours with a reported incidence of 2 to 4 cases per million population per year.2 The characteristic features of AF are slow growth, benign but locally aggressive behaviour and high recurrence rate without metastasising capacity.
"We now know that about 20% of cytologically benign thyroid nodules will grow," said Dr.
Haemangiopericytoma is characterised microscopically by a solid proliferation of oval to spindle-shaped cells that appear cytologically bland, often with vascular arcades interspersed.