cytokinesis

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cytokinesis

 [si″to-kĭ-ne´sis]
the division of the cytoplasm between daughter cells in mitosis or meiosis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cy·to·ki·ne·sis

(sī'tō-ki-nē'sis),
Changes occurring in the cytoplasm of the cell outside the nucleus during cell division.
Synonym(s): cytodieresis
[cyto- + G. kinēsis, movement]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cytokinesis

(sī′tō-kə-nē′sĭs, -kī-)
n.
The division of the cytoplasm of a cell following the division of the nucleus.

cy′to·ki·net′ic (-nĕt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cy·to·ki·ne·sis

(sī'tō-ki-nē'sis)
Changes occurring in the protoplasm of the cell outside the nucleus during cell division.
[cyto- + G. kinēsis, movement]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cytokinesis

a part of CELL DIVISION that usually occurs during TELOPHASE of nuclear division. The cytoplasm becomes divided into two parts which are sometimes unequal, e.g. the production of ova and polar bodies during OOGENESIS. The mode of splitting differs between organisms. In higher plants, a special membrane-producing area (the CELL PLATE) develops internally and becomes joined to the outer membrane; in lower plants, the cell wall and plasma membrane grow in from outside; in animals, the plasma membrane forms a deep cleft from the outside inwards which eventually divides the cell.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(1) Department of Cytokinetics, Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno, Czech Republic
Quadilobing in certain liverworts is preceded by pre-meiotic bands of microtubules marking the future cytokinetic planes before the nucleus enters prophase I (Fig.
The PPB is component of the cytokinetic apparatus (Gunning, 1982) that marks and prepares the future division site.
In our earlier study on furrow ingression in control and Rappaport furrows (Argiros et al., 2012), we demonstrated that once furrowing commenced, centralspindlin-bundled overlapping microtubules from opposite asters in the equatorial cortex appeared to function as "miniature central spindles" in cytokinetic signaling, and accompanied the furrow as it ingressed to completion.
In our present study, we support and extend the miniature central spindle hypothesis by demonstrating that aligned arrays of centralspindlin-bundled microtubules not associated with a normal mitotic apparatus, were capable of performing cytokinetic signaling.
In all jungermanniopsid liverworts investigated, the expression of quadripolarity is initiated in sporocytes just entering the meiotic pathway by premeiotic bands of microtubules that define the future cytokinetic planes and result in deeply quadrilobed cytoplasm.
These premeiotic bands mark the future cytokinetic planes along which cleavage of the spore tetrad will occur after meiosis.
The fundamental role of the QMS establishes ail aspects of division quadripolarity; it determines the future cytokinetic planes and spindle orientation for both meiosis I and II.
This self-organized network of actin filaments resembles the cytokinetic ring of dividing cells in the following ways: (i) it exhibits myosin-II-mediated, anti-parallel sliding of actin filaments (4, 5), and (ii) it assembles during the M-phase of the cell cycle.
Cytokinetic and cytogenetic effect of agricultural chemicals on human lymphoid cells in vitro.
Similarly, these advanced charophytes exhibit a distinctly land-plant ("embryophytic") pattern of mitotic and cytokinetic events, including, an open mitosis with a persistent, interzonal spindle (the daughter mitotic nuclei remaining separated at a distance) and a phragmoplast (spindle fiber remnants perpendicular to the cytokinetic plane and associated golgi-derived vesicles; el.
These results support a model of cytokinesis in which a local rise in free [Ca.sup.2+] is part of the signaling pathway that regulates assembly of the cytokinetic ring of actin filaments.