cystoscope

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cystoscope

 [sis´to-skōp]
a hollow metal endoscope especially designed for passing through the urethra into the bladder to permit visual inspection of the bladder interior. See also cystoscopy.

cys·to·scope

(sis'tō-skōp),
A lighted tubular endoscope for examining the interior of the bladder.
[cysto- + G. skopeō, to examine]

cystoscope

(sĭs′tə-skōp′)
n.
A tubular instrument equipped with a light and used to examine the interior of the urinary bladder and ureter.

cys′to·scop′ic (-skŏp′ĭk) adj.
cys·tos′co·py (sĭ-stŏs′kə-pē) n.

cystoscope

[sis′təskōp′]
Etymology: Gk, kystis + skopein, to look
an instrument for examining and treating lesions of the urethra or bladder. There are both rigid and flexible types. The rigid instrument consists of an obturator for introduction, an outer sheath, a lighting system, a viewing lens, and ports for catheters and operative devices. The flexible cystoscope is a self-contained endoscope with ports for instrumentation and irrigation. Flexible cystoscopes are more commonly used today and incorporate fiberoptics.
enlarge picture
Cystoscope in the male bladder

cys·to·scope

(sis'tŏ-skōp)
A lighted tubular endoscope for examining the interior of the bladder.
[cysto- + G. skopeō, to examine]

cystoscope

A straight tubular instrument which allows illumination of the inside of the urinary bladder so that direct examination, and various forms of treatment, are possible.

Cystoscope

A viewing instrument that is passed up the urethra into the region of the prostate to get a good look at the organ "from the inside."

cystoscope

an endoscope especially designed for passing through the urethra into the bladder to permit visual inspection of the interior of that organ. It has an outer sheath with a lighting system, a telescope with forward or oblique viewing, and an obturator which can be removed to allow passage of various devices.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the analysis phase of the project, just over 63% of cystoscopies were scheduled directly as a result of a primary care or emergency department consult, meaning the veteran had never seen nor spoken to a urologist or urology nurse prior to the scheduling the appointment.
The charge nurse is notified of all cystoscopies at time of scheduling.
As noted above, the analysis found that a little more than 63% of outpatient cystoscopies were scheduled directly as a result of interdisciplinary consults.
At the start of the project there were over 200 patients on the waiting list for surveillance cystoscopies.
Firstly, there was no system of determining how many patients were on the waiting list for surveillance flexible cystoscopy as the lists were all amalgamated with the diagnostic cystoscopies.
It is recommended that the nurse will have had two years' experience in urology and additionally complete a comprehensive in-house training program with the support of a urology consultant, to undertake flexible cystoscopies independently (BAUS 2000).
It is important as nurses to have evidence of the flexible cystoscopies within the training period (BAUS 2000), a report was devised specifically for the nurses' portfolio.
The Drain-Jug(R) is a disposable 15-liter gravity-fed drain receptacle designed primarily for cystoscopies and arthrocopies and other procedures where there is a significant amount of fluids used for flushing and irrigating.
DiagnoCure estimates that, with a population totalling more than 100 million, some 270,000 cytologies and 300,000 to 500,000 cystoscopies are conducted annually in Germany, Belgium and The Netherlands.