cystoscope

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cystoscope

 [sis´to-skōp]
a hollow metal endoscope especially designed for passing through the urethra into the bladder to permit visual inspection of the bladder interior. See also cystoscopy.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cys·to·scope

(sis'tō-skōp),
A lighted tubular endoscope for examining the interior of the bladder.
[cysto- + G. skopeō, to examine]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cystoscope

(sĭs′tə-skōp′)
n.
A tubular instrument equipped with a light and used to examine the interior of the urinary bladder and ureter.

cys′to·scop′ic (-skŏp′ĭk) adj.
cys·tos′co·py (sĭ-stŏs′kə-pē) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cys·to·scope

(sis'tŏ-skōp)
A lighted tubular endoscope for examining the interior of the bladder.
[cysto- + G. skopeō, to examine]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cystoscope

A straight tubular instrument which allows illumination of the inside of the urinary bladder so that direct examination, and various forms of treatment, are possible.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Cystoscope

A viewing instrument that is passed up the urethra into the region of the prostate to get a good look at the organ "from the inside."
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Primary localized amyloidosis of the urinary bladder is very rare, but because it presents with clinical, radiological, and cystoscopic findings that are similar to those of primary urothelial carcinoma of the bladder, it has a diagnostic importance.
In a retrospective series of over 300 cases of flexible cystoscopic ureteral stenting without fluoroscopy, we believe that it is a safe, efficacious (85.4%) and well-tolerated procedure to deal with cases of ureteric obstruction.
Caption: FIGURE 1: (a) Preoperative and (b, c) intraoperative cystoscopic findings of abnormal bladder lesions.
Caption: Figure 1: Cystoscopic view of two vesicouterine fistula (VUF) orifices in the posterior bladder wall.
Only one patient's stent was removed using simple cystoscopic stent retrieval (SCSR) after ESWL in each of the 25-36 months and >36 months groups.
In present series on the basis of MCU, UDS and cystoscopic findings at the time of follow up cystoscopic valve fulguration had been done in 26% cases along with unilateral ureteric reimplantation in 10% cases, bilateral ureteric reimplantation in 4% cases, nephroureterectomy in 12% cases and medical treatment in 74% cases.
Endovenously administered dexamethasone was the major satisfactory therapy in improving RHC, which was refractory to cystoscopic flocculation and was an alternative to the vesical artery embolization failure.
Because the cystoscopic features were not clear and an infective origin could not be excluded, the patient underwent an open biopsy.
(2) There are no specific findings on ultrasonography, computed tomographic scanning, magnetic resonance imaging, or on cystoscopic examination.
Cystoscopic removal of an intravesical gossypiboma mimicking a bladder mass: a case report.
Intravenous pyelogram (IVP) was conducted in two patients with ureteral injury, one was treated with cystoscopic ureteral catheterization and the other with ureteric reimplantation.
Cystoscopic examination (CE) is accepted as the gold standard for the detection of disorders of chronic schistosomiasis.