honeycomb lung

(redirected from cystic lung)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

hon·ey·comb lung

the radiologic and gross appearance of the lungs resulting from interstitial fibrosis and cystic dilation of bronchioles and distal air spaces; of unknown cause or a sequel of any of several diseases, including eosinophilic granuloma, sarcoidosis, and any interstitial lung disease.
Synonym(s): cystic lung
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hon·ey·comb lung

(hŏn'ē-kōm lŭng)
The radiologic and gross appearance of the lungs resulting from interstitial fibrosis and cystic dilation of bronchioles and distal air spaces; a sequel of any of several diseases, including eosinophilic granuloma and sarcoidosis.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

honeycomb lung

An abnormal appearance of the lungs seen on chest x-ray exam, in which small cystic spaces alternate with coarsely increased interstitial markings. This pattern is typical of pulmonary injury caused by inhalation of dusts, minerals, toxic gases, or fibers; rheumatological diseases; and interstitial pneumonitis.
See also: lung
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

honeycomb lung

An X-ray appearance found in some cases of INTERSTITIAL PULMONARY FIBROSIS and in some rare conditions such as HISTIOCYTOSIS and TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Table-1: Demographic data of patients with congenital cystic lung lesions including pre-operative status.
Table-2: Congenital Cystic Lung Lesions Clinical presentation, Differential Diagnosis and treatment
Clinical analysis of etiology of 25 cases of multiple cystic lung disease in children.
Nicolaides, "Current outcome of antenatally diagnosed cystic lung disease," Journal of Pediatric Surgery, vol.
Interestingly, in the present case, the cystic lung lesions on chest computed tomography (CT) gradually enlarged and increased in number over a 6-year period.
We classified cystic lung diseases based on their dominant mechanism of cyst formation (as in Table 1).
HRCT is helpful in differentiating PLCH from other cystic lung diseases.
Then, surgical treatment was performed for the patient; the pathology showed [Figure 1]d cystic lung bronchiectasis with hemorrhage, proliferation of granulation tissue and fibrous tissue, and epithelial tissue of the cyst wall scales with atypical hyperplasia.
Pulmonary sequestration is an embryonic malformation forming a nonfunctional cystic lung tissue which is not connected to the normal tracheobronchial tree and receives its blood supply aberrently from systemic circulation.
(2) Cystic lung disease, spontaneous pneumothorax, and upper lobe parenchymal opacities have been reported in the literature.