cymose


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Related to cymose: bracteate

cymose

(of an inflorescence) having growing parts that end in flowers, as a result of which the combined growth depends on the production of lateral growing points; the oldest part of the inflorescence is thus at the apex.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The cymose branching may repeat itself from the axillary bud of the prophylls in each flowering axis of the following order, and then some partial florescences (cymes) may show a complex structure (Rua, 1999).
Capitulescences monocephalous, terminal, less commonly cymose, with few to many capitula.
Capitulescences cymose, glomerate, axillary or terminal; capitula long-pedunculate to subsessile, homogamous, one-flowered; receptacle epaleate; involucre multiseriate.
In Fabaceae (Leguminosae), the basic inflorescence type is a raceme, but evolutionary shifts have led to pseudoracemes in five tribes of Papilionoideae (Tucker, 1987) and to cymose inflorescences in a few taxa, including caesalpinioid Dialium and related genera (Tucker, 1998; other cymose legumes are discussed therein).
An alternate view to an indeterminate inflorescence as a precursor for the typical asteraceous capitulum was suggested by Cronquist (1977), who proposed that the ancestors to the Asteraceae had a cymose (determinate) inflorescence that was condensed into a head, which then "was gradually converted" from the cymose or determinate state to the racemose or indeterminate state.
In these families it is quite common to find that the development of a cymose cluster of flowers in the axil of a bract is terminated by the formation of a vegetative bud in place of the last flower, or in some cases a vegetative bud occurs directly in the bract axil.
Also in the Alismataceae and the related Limnocharitaceae it is common to find cymose clusters of flowers in which the cymose development is terminated by the formation of a vegetative bud (Charlton, 1973; Wilder, 1974a).
The LFY/FLO homologs are essential for normal development in plants with cymose inflorescences (the sympodial growth of the Solonaceae) and racemose inflorescences (simple and compound).
Stebbins (1974) has argued that a cymose inflorescence was basal in the angiosperms.
Inflorescence solitary or cymose (usually dichasial, rarely monochasial), seldom racemose; bracteoles may be present even large and foliar or connate and adnate to the calyx (Zonanthus).