cyme


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cyme

a CYMOSE inflorescence.
References in periodicals archive ?
@DistribuTECH - GridUnity, a a company involved in distributed energy analytics software-as-a-service, is launching a new platform integration collaboration with Eaton's CYME International T&D.
[I do not remember having washed my lips in the old nag's fountain, nor having slept on two headed Parnassus, so that I might suddenly become a poet.] (24) Strangely, Screech credits the reference to the double cyme in this poem to Ovid in the Metamorphoses rather than to Persius, to whom he attributes the next two lies, though the passage from the Metamorphoses has no relation to Du Bellay's poetic context other than the presence of the words mons biceps (Screech 56).
Kapardis said urbanisation combined with increased anonymity plus globalisation and increased mobility contributed to the changes and the emergence of the egocentric, or Cyme, me, meCO generation.
The authors looked at three inflorescence structures that occur in nature: the panicle, the raceme, and the cyme. They compared these to theoretical structures that don't exist, and from this information attempted to come up with a model with an evolutionary perspective about how the existing types could be related to each other through genetic change.
There are still traces of fragrance In the weave of that dress I can't seem to part with, the cyme of its lace.
6.3 User Manual 2007, Cyme International, Monteral, Canada
Cyme. Multiflowered pedicels attach themselves at the same point on the peduncle.
In April 1837 John Miers collected close to Rio de Janeiro a curious, achlorophyllous, almost leafless plant, with a slender, rarely branched stem, bearing a terminal bifurcate, cincinnous (scorpioid cyme) inflorescence (Miers 1841).
cyme. An inflorescence in which each terminal growing point produces flowers.
A cyme (rhymes with lime) is an inflorescence that is broad and often flat-topped.
For example, Archippe, daughter of Dikaiogenes, among other beneficent acts, paid for a sacrifice and banquet for the people of Cyme, as recorded in decrees passed by the assembly of Cyme in her honour in the second century B.C.(76)
historian, Ephorus of Cyme.(1) But can Ephorus, the author of a universal history in thirty books, be so easily and curtly dismissed?(2) Modern scholarship is generally biased against Ephorus for two reasons: because our familiarity with his narrative is chiefly mediated through the much abbreviated account of Diodorus Siculus, and because of his alleged intellectual subservience to his reputed master Isocrates.