cycles per second


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cy·cles per sec·ond (cps),

(sī'kilz sek'ŭnd),
The number of successive compressions and rarefactions per second of a sound wave. The preferred designation for this unit of frequency is hertz.

cy·cles per sec·ond

(cps) (sī'kĕlz pĕr sek'ŏnd)
The number of successive compressions and rarefactions per second of a sound wave. The preferred designation for this unit of frequency is hertz.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Apple II+ and IIe that I started working on were between 1 and 2 megahertz or 1 to 2 million cycles per second.
Already at 35 billion cycles per second, or gigahertz (GHz), the rates are expected to reach 100 GHz, says Mancoff.
6 cycles per second which is right in the middle of frequencies used in the brain's natural rhythm," he said.
The motor can test strain levels greater than 100% and frequencies from one cycle per day to 400 cycles per second to simulate the critical conditions for the particular component being modeled.
4-minute waves are much too slow to be seen by the LIGO detectors being built in the United States, which will listen for frequencies of dozens to thousands of cycles per second.
While AMD's fastest chip falls short of two gigahertz - or two billion cycles per second - the company claims its chips are more efficient than Intel's and can be faster even at lower clock speeds.
Larry Pendell, Principal of ENGENAIRE, emphasized, "The Variable Speed Generator will produce constant numbers of AC cycles (like 60 cycles per second for example) regardless of the input shaft speed.
Frequencies are measured in the number of cycles per second, termed Hertz, e.
What's more, the devices operate only at thousands of cycles per second rather than the billions that are now routine for microchips.
6 cycles per second, which is right in the middle of frequencies used in the brain's natural rhythm.
1 maker of microchips began selling a processor that runs at two billion cycles per second, marking a doubling of the speed of computer chips in only 18 months.
The TurboXim simulator delivers a peak performance of over 180 million cycles per second on highly iterative code (such as a matrix multiplication DSP kernel), a sustained 50 million simulation cycles per second on complex code running on a typical Xtensa or Diamond Standard processor, and even delivers a sustained 25 million cycles per second on more complex simulations, such as simulating an AAC (Advanced Audio Coding) audio decoder on a VLIW (Very Large Instruction Word) audio DSP processor configuration.