cycad


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cycad

(sī′kad″, kăd) [L. Cycas, a genus name]
A variety of palmlike evergreen plants, including Cycas revoluta and C. circinalis, from which cycasin has been isolated.

cycad

any tropical or subtropical GYMNOSPERM of the order Cycadales. Cycads date from the MESOZOIC PERIOD. Present-day forms grow to 20 m in height and have a crown of fern-like leaves. They live for up to a thousand years.

cycad

a member of the plant genus of cycas, dioecious, non-flowering woody plants (gymnosperms) which produce seeds in a woody cone consisting of exposed seed leaves (sporophylls), not enclosed in an ovary. The leaves are usually in a rosette at the top of the stem, which may be subterranean. Include Bowenia, Cycas, Dioon, Encephalartos, Lepidozamia, Macrozamia, Zamia spp.

cycad glycoside
group of glycosides including cycasin, macrozamin, found in cycad plants; oxidized in vivo to release toxin methylazoxymethanol (MAM).
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite their broad geographic range throughout sub-Saharan Africa, most of the continent's cycad species are relatively localized (Melville, 1957; Goode, 1989, 2001; Jones.
However in our case, the cycad species are rare, narrowly distributed and one species, C.
Mexico is second worldwide in cycad diversity (42 species in 3 genera), and more than 80% of these species are endemic (Vovides 2000).
Now the database is being used to guide planning and fossil exploration at the site and to present the powerful cautionary tale of Fossil Cycad to national park visitors across the country.
Leaf production and the cost of reproduction in the neotropical rain forest cycad, Zamia skinneri.
Reflecting this interest, and 'using all available cycad literature', Bonta and Osborne (2007:1) published a worldwide review, 'Cycads in the vernacular: A compendium of local names', in which they 'compiled a table of scientific names, localities, languages, vernacular names and where known, translations into English'.
The Chamorro made tortillas out of ground cycad seeds, which they washed repeatedly to remove toxins (if their chickens didn't die after drinking the wash water, the people deemed the seeds safe to grind and eat).
Mast Seeding in the Cycad Macrozamia communis: Interactions with Mammalian Seed Dispersers.
The Podocarpus and cycad families are ancient relatives of conifers -- pines, junipers, cypresses, firs, and redwoods.