cybernetics


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Related to cybernetics: cyborg, Systems theory

cybernetics

 [si″ber-net´iks]
the science of communication and control in the animal and in the machine.

cy·ber·net·ics

(sī'ber-net'iks),
1. The comparative study of computers and the human nervous system, with intent to explain the functioning of the brain.
See also: feedback.
2. The science of control and communication in both living and nonliving systems; characteristically, control is governed by feedback, that is, by communication within the system concerning the difference between the actual and the desired result, action then being modified so as to minimize this difference.
See also: feedback.
[G. kybernētica, things pertaining to control or piloting]

cybernetics

(sī′bər-nĕt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The theoretical study of communication and control processes in biological, mechanical, and electronic systems, especially the comparison of these processes in biological and artificial systems.

cy′ber·net′ic adj.
cy′ber·net′i·cal·ly adv.
cy′ber·net′i·cist, cy′ber·ne·ti′cian (-nĭ-tĭsh′ən) n.

cybernetics

The formal study of the functions of human control and the mechanical and electronic devices designed to replace them.

cy·ber·net·ics

(sī'bĕr-net'iks)
1. The comparative study of computers and the human nervous system, with intent to explain the functioning of the brain.
2. The science of control and communication in both living and nonliving systems; characteristically, control is governed by feedback, that is, by communication within the system concerning the difference between the actual and the desired result, action then being modified so as to minimize this difference.
See also: feedback
[G. kybernētika, things pertaining to control or piloting]

cybernetics

The study of the control and communication systems common to machines and animals, including the human being. The study of the analogies between complex feedback control systems and human physiology has been fruitful to both disciplines.

cybernetics

the study of the comparison of control in the workings of the living body with man-made mechanical systems such as are used in robots.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cybernetics endures today, scattered across fields such as artificial intelligence, cognitive science, computational neuroscience, control theory, and complexity theory.
Socially chaotic conditions, Dyer-Witheford insists, "require further everyday use of cybernetics for people to survive proletarianization." (121)
Tao, "Adaptive fault-tolerant control of uncertain nonlinear large-scale systems with unknown dead zone," IEEE Transactions on Cybernetics, vol.
Would you say that the Foucauldian methodology you draw upon parallels practices of looking that arose through an integration of cybernetics, design, and the social sciences that you describe as a type of communicative objectivity?
Both in the rather broad sense associated with the servo-mechanisms and feedback loops of cybernetics, as well as in the much more specific sense associated with the programming practices of computation, the history of control is one that extends well beyond the selective memory of scientists, and is as much about engineering as it is about scientific development.
The American Society for Cybernetics defines cybernetics as, "the study of systems and processes that interact with themselves and produce themselves from themselves." While the term "cybernetics" is primarily used within scientific academia, it has been shortened and added to other words yielding such terms as cyberpunk, cyborg**, and cyberspace.
Cybernetics makes it clear that the phenomena associated with the environment within or the be spoke and intensity of these relationships, roles, forms and degrees of complexity [8].
In rats, on the other hand, the eyes generally move in opposite directions," explained Jason Kerr from the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics.
In rats, on the other hand, the eyes generally move in opposite directions," explains Jason Kerr from the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics.
His idiosyncratic interest in anarchism led him to publish an article, 'The Development and Significance of Cybernetics' in Colin Ward's journal Anarchy in 1963, prompting a response later that same year in the same journal from computer scientist John McEwan, 'Anarchism and the Cybernetics of Self-Organizing Systems'.
Yorktown, VA, February 20, 2013 --(PR.com)-- Cybernetics has announced the release of the powerful iSAN 7000 line of iSCSI SAN storage units.