cybernetics

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cybernetics

 [si″ber-net´iks]
the science of communication and control in the animal and in the machine.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cy·ber·net·ics

(sī'ber-net'iks),
1. The comparative study of computers and the human nervous system, with intent to explain the functioning of the brain.
See also: feedback.
2. The science of control and communication in both living and nonliving systems; characteristically, control is governed by feedback, that is, by communication within the system concerning the difference between the actual and the desired result, action then being modified so as to minimize this difference.
See also: feedback.
[G. kybernētica, things pertaining to control or piloting]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cybernetics

(sī′bər-nĕt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The theoretical study of communication and control processes in biological, mechanical, and electronic systems, especially the comparison of these processes in biological and artificial systems.

cy′ber·net′ic adj.
cy′ber·net′i·cal·ly adv.
cy′ber·net′i·cist, cy′ber·ne·ti′cian (-nĭ-tĭsh′ən) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cybernetics

The formal study of the functions of human control and the mechanical and electronic devices designed to replace them.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cy·ber·net·ics

(sī'bĕr-net'iks)
1. The comparative study of computers and the human nervous system, with intent to explain the functioning of the brain.
2. The science of control and communication in both living and nonliving systems; characteristically, control is governed by feedback, that is, by communication within the system concerning the difference between the actual and the desired result, action then being modified so as to minimize this difference.
See also: feedback
[G. kybernētika, things pertaining to control or piloting]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cybernetics

The study of the control and communication systems common to machines and animals, including the human being. The study of the analogies between complex feedback control systems and human physiology has been fruitful to both disciplines.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

cybernetics

the study of the comparison of control in the workings of the living body with man-made mechanical systems such as are used in robots.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The cybernetic turn happened during Ceccato and Somenzi's stay in London in the early 1950s, during which they met the cyberneticist William Grey Walter and collaborated with Imperial College London.
In the same issue, Sir Leon Bagrit, a British cyberneticist, was quoted as saying, "The pace of technical change is so fast now that we must be prepared for a man to change not only his job, but his entire skills, three or four times in a lifetime."
The award, named for famed MIT mathematician and cyberneticist Norbert Weiner, was presented to McCracken by CPSR President Terry Winograd during a meeting at George Washington University.
601 Adademgorodok, Novosibirsk, RSFSR, USSR Cyberneticist (CCSJ) Grigory Mendelevich Akselrod Denied Exit Visa Wife: Elena Mikhailovna Ulitsa Bela Kuna 8, Apt.
But they're also personalized in a Chaucerian way, often against type: The Cyberneticist is emotional and intuitive, the Chemist a thoughtful synthesizer of options and opinions.
The coherence of "machine credibility" as a legal construct depends on whether the construct promotes decisional accuracy, not on what cyberneticists or metaphysicists have to say about whether a machine can ever achieve "real boy" status.
that cyberneticists' overconfidence in information as a panacea
Broadcast in March 1963, Time On Our Hands was a docu-fiction about the city of the future--Holyhead in 1988--imagining a world in which the Russians got to the Moon first (in 1967), mass unemployment is rife as a result of increasing automation, cyberneticists have become hill farmers and the core problem is 'how to spend a golden lifetime, what to do with so much time'.
For example, two important areas of work in nontraditional AI were inspired by the work of early cyberneticists: Rodney Brooks (former director of the AI Lab at MIT and chief technology officer of iRobot Corporation) credits Walter's tortoises with inspiring his research with situated robots, and Warren McCulloch (another early cybernetics worker not discussed in the book) was the father of the field that evolved into the study of neural networks.
At first Lotman appealed for support to mathematicians and pioneering cyberneticists, who would add the gleam of science to his enterprise while he grafted a human face onto theirs.
"Fracture" posits that the cyberneticists are the good guys and puts players in control of Brody, who finds himself on the front lines of the battle to stop nefarious Pacifica Gen.