cyanotic


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Related to cyanotic: Cyanotic heart disease

cy·a·not·ic

(sī'ă-not'ik), Avoid substituting the substandard cyanosed for this word.
Relating to or marked by cyanosis.

cyanotic

See cyanosed.

cy·a·not·ic

(sī'ă-not'ik)
Relating to or marked by cyanosis.
Synonym(s): cyanosed.

Cyanotic

Marked by bluish discoloration of the skin due to a lack of oxygen in the blood. It is one of the types of congenital heart disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
This article has highlighted some of the commonest noncyanotic and cyanotic conditions requiring regular follow up with cardiac MRI.
Risk factors for brain abscess in patients with congenital cyanotic heart disease.
In patients with cyanotic heart disease, underlying coagulopathy and polycythaemia are responsible for predisposing them to stroke.
TOF being the major cyanotic congenital cardiac defect needs to be surgically repair in all age groups and the problems encountered of residual shunts can be addressed in cardiac catheterization lab13 14.
In chronic cases, combs and wattles show cyanotic appearance while edematous swelling in face and joints are common (Rhoades and Rimler, 1989).
Hypoxemic/Reoxygenation Induced Oxidative Stress in Cyanotic Heart Disease.
The newborn child was also found to be cyanotic at birth, with brown blood similar to the mother's.
fang marks with cyanotic swelling areas and above mentioned symptoms and history as witnessed by owner.
The mortality of adolescent and adults with CHD in the study is consistent with what has been reported previously with the mortality being higher in cyanotic and Fontan patients and the lowest mortality rate in patient with atrial and ventricular septal defects.
3%) patient in the ECC group was polycythaemic because of suffering from cyanotic congenital heart disease.
All the qualitative variables like presenting signs and symptoms like central cyanosis, recurrent chest infection, echocardiographic findings like normal, cyanotic CHD, cyanotic CHD, were analyzed for percentages and frequencies.
They explain to physicians, cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, nurse specialists, pediatricians, and students the topics of embryology, fetal malformations, genetics, anatomy, pathology, classification, imaging, the clinical approach, diagnostic investigations, management issues, interventions for surgery/heart-lung transplantation, the transition of care to adulthood, and shunt defects, right and left ventricular obstructive lesions, congenital valvular lesions, diseases of the aorta, cyanotic heart diseases, congenital cardiomyopathies, electrophysiological issues in children, and long-term issues for adults, including pregnancy, contraception, and gynecological issues.