glycoside

(redirected from Cyanogenic glycosides)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

glycoside

 [gli´ko-sīd]
any compound containing a carbohydrate molecule (sugar), particularly any such natural product in plants, convertible, by hydrolytic cleavage, into a sugar and a nonsugar component (aglycone), and named specifically for the sugar contained, such as fructoside (fructose), glucoside (glucose), or pentoside (pentose).
cardiac glycoside any of a group of glycosides occurring in certain plants (Digitalis, etc.), having a characteristic action on the contractile force of the heart muscle.

gly·co·side

(glī'kō-sīd),
Condensation product of a sugar with any other radical involving the loss of the OH of the hemiacetal or hemiketal of the sugar, leaving the anomeric carbon as the link; thus, condensation through the carbon with an alcohol, which loses its hydrogen on its hydroxyl group, yields an alcohol-glycoside (or a glycosido-alcohol); links with a purine or pyrimidine -NH- group yield glycosyl (or N-glycosyl) compounds.

glycoside

(glī′kə-sīd′)
n.
Any of a group of organic compounds, occurring abundantly in plants, that yield a sugar and one or more nonsugar substances on hydrolysis.

gly′co·sid′ic (-sĭd′ĭk) adj.

glycoside

Biochemistry
A molecule formed from the condensation of either a furanose or a pyranose with another molecule as an acetal nitrogen glycoside or phosphate ester glycoside; cardiac glycosides include digitoxin, digoxin and ouabain.

Herbal medicine
Any of a number of medicinally active compounds produced by plants, which include hydrocyanic (prussic acid), which gives cough syrup its bitter almond flavour, digitoxin, a cardioactive agent, and salicin, the basis for salicylic acid.

glycoside

Pharmacology A molecule formed from the condensation of either a furanose or a pyranose with another molecule as an acetal, nitrogen glycoside, or phosphate ester glycoside; cardiac glycosides include digitoxin, digoxin, ouabain

gly·co·side

(glī'kō-sīd)
Condensation product of a sugar with any other radical involving the loss of the H of the hemiacetal or hemiketal OH of the sugar, leaving the O of this OH as the link.

glycoside

an acetal derivative of a sugar that, on hydrolysis by enzymes or acids, gives rise to a sugar. Glycosides containing glucose are called glucosides, those with galactose are called galactosides. They render unwanted substances chemically inert or form food reserves such as GLYCOGEN.

Glycoside

An herbal carbohydrate that exerts powerful effect on hormone-producing tissues. The glycoside breaks down into a sugar and a non-sugar component.
Mentioned in: Echinacea

gly·co·side

(glī'kō-sīd)
Condensation product of a sugar with any other radical involving the loss of the OH of the hemiacetal or hemiketal of the sugar.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cassava, an edible tuberous root often made into flour, contains cyanogenic glycosides, which can result in fatal cyanide poisoning if not properly detoxified by soaking, drying, and scraping before being consumed.
Education of farmers and consumers about the importance of strict adherence to established methods of degrading cyanogenic glycosides in cassava is essential to prevent cyanide poisoning.
Plant cyanogenic glycosides. Toxicon, 38 (2000) 11-36.
The freshly harvested bamboo shoot are creamy yellow in colour with pungent smell and bitter taste, due to the presence cyanogenic glycoside, named taxiphyllin which is toxic in nature (4).
[71] Anonymous, "Cyanogenic glycosides in cassava and bamboo shoots, a human health risk assessment," Tech.
The ingestion of cyanide or a cyanogenic glycoside can trigger off a lot of toxic manifestations.
In addition, some ornamental plants, especially hydrangeas throughout the South, and trees (elderberry) also contain cyanogenic glycosides in their flowers (hydrangeas) or leaves and stems (elderberry).
Many cyanogenic glycosides have been implicated in allelopathy (Rice, 1984).
This result could be explained by the fact that the protein and HCN (cyanogenic glycosides) content of cassava foliage depends on variety, stage of maturity, soil fertility and climate.
Preliminary phytochemical screening of the extract revealed the presence of saponins, cyanogenic glycosides, tannins, flavonoids and carbohydrates.
Although the causes of these syndromes, in general, have been considered multifactorial, specific etiologic agents (e.g., cyanogenic glycosides from cassava [4,5 ] and human lymphotropic virus type I [6 ]) have been implicated in some reports.