cutin


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cu·tin

(kyū'tin),
A specially prepared, thin, animal membrane used as a protective covering for wounded surfaces.
[L. cutis, skin]

cutin

(kū′tĭn) [L. cutis, skin]
A wax that combines with cellulose to form the cuticle of plants.

cutin

1. a waxy constituent of the cuticle of plants.
2. a preparation of ox serosa used as suture material and as a wound dressing.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Resistance of a cell wall to concentrated sulfuric acid digestion is characteristic of walls containing cutin, suberin, or lignin (Wilson and Peterson, 1983).
The failure of the surface walls to be digested is an indicator of cutin, suberin, or lignin.
In the alkyl range (0-30 ppm), the signal between 29 and 33 ppm was typical for methylene C, commonly derived from long-chained lipids and aliphatic biopolymers such as suberin, cutin, and resin (Skjemstad et al.
A bamboo culm has an outer layer that is covered by heavily cutinized shiny cuticle, which itself is overlaid with a layer of waxy cutin to prevent loss of water from the culm.
According to Oliveira (2008), CMNT presents a high indigestible fraction of NDF (average of 66% of NDF) due to the high cutin content and treatment of CM with lime had no effect on the non-degradable fraction of NDF, but increased the ruminal degradation rate (kd) of the NDFap by an average of 7%.
Its accumulation is attributed to the formation of polymethylene end products by the microbial mineralisation of SOM under aerobic conditions (Oades 1995), and to the selective utilisation of other labile forms of plant C and preservation of plant- derived polymers (such as cutin, suberin, etc.
Cutin and suberin were used as models of the types of aliphatic materials produced by plants and microorganisms.
Chemical shift Amino Hexose Lignin Cutin Suberin region (ppm) acid 210-162 26.