cutaneous vasculitis

cu·ta·ne·ous vas·cu·li·tis

an acute form of vasculitis that may affect the skin only, but also may involve other organs, with a polymorphonuclear infiltrate in the walls of and surrounding small (dermal) vessels. Nuclear fragments are formed by karyorrhexis of the neutrophils.
See also: leukocytoclastic vasculitis.

cu·ta·ne·ous vas·cu·li·tis

(kyū-tā'nē-ŭs vas'kyū-lī'tis)
An acute form of vasculitis that may affect the skin only, but also may involve other organs, with a polymorphonuclear infiltrate in the walls of and surrounding small (dermal) vessels. Nuclear fragments are formed by karyorrhexis of the neutrophils.
See also: leukocytoclastic vasculitis
References in periodicals archive ?
Cutaneous vasculitis per se has not been reported with visceral leishmaniasis, especially at disease presentation and thus, could be a possible red herring in timely diagnosis and treatment.
One third to one half of cutaneous vasculitis cases are idiopathic (unknown cause) the remainder, however ,have a variety of causes.
Neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis mimicking cutaneous vasculitis in a lupus patient: a complication of cyclophosphamide.
More broad-ranging than ARAMIS, CUTIS is seeking 50 patients with several forms of idiopathic vasculitis, including cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, drug-induced vasculitis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, IgA vasculitis, isolated cutaneous vasculitis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, microscopic polyangiitis, polyarteritis nodosa, and urticarial vasculitis.
Hydrallazine-induced cutaneous vasculitis. Br Med J 1980; 280:156-57.
Santamaria et al., "Cutaneous vasculitis in a patient with acute brucellosis," Dermatologica, vol.
Cutaneous vasculitis is generally thought of as being palpable purpura, but other infrequent types of lesions can occur, such as ulcers or ischemic lesions [1, 2].
Objective: To document the clinical features, type of vasculitis and underlying causative factors in cutaneous vasculitis.
Cutaneous vasculitis. Rheum Dis Clin North Am 1990;16:309-24.
Purpuric eruptions and urticarial vasculitis are categorized as cutaneous vasculitis and together accounted for 42% of all skin lesions.
Dapsone is used for treatment or prophylaxis of several infections and dermatological conditions such as bullous dermatoses, cutaneous vasculitis, and dermatitis herpetiformis.
A recent study of 421 patients with cutaneous vasculitis identified malignancy in 3.8%, of which over half were haematological in origin [2].