cutaneous leiomyosarcoma

cutaneous leiomyosarcoma

An uncommon (circa 100 cases reported in the world literature) malignant neoplasm with a predilection for the hair-bearing areas of the lower extremities. Cutaneous leiomyosarcomas are divided into a superficial dermal form, which is thought to arise from the arrector pili muscles, and a deep subcutaneous type, which is thought to arise from the smooth muscle of the vascular wall.
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(2016) reported a case of cutaneous leiomyosarcoma at the base of the right wing of a five-year-old Australian Parakeet (Melopsittacus undulatus).
Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma with osteoid metaplasia in a budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus): a case report.
The differential diagnosis of pilar leiomyoma includes smooth muscle hamartoma, dermatomyofibroma, and cutaneous leiomyosarcoma. Smooth muscle hamartoma is characterized by a haphazard arrangement of smooth muscle bundles separated by abundant dermal collagen.
Primary cutaneous leiomyosarcoma accounts for a significant proportion of superficial soft tissue sarcomas, but it is more common in deep locations, such as the retroperitoneum and abdomen.
Histologically, cutaneous leiomyosarcoma has an infiltrative growth pattern, and consists of atypical spindle tumor cells arranged in a fascicular growth pattern.
Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma originating in a symplastic pilar leiomyoma: a rare occurrence and potential diagnostic pitfall.
Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma with myxoid alteration arising in a setting of multiple cutaneous smooth muscle neoplasms.
Although cutaneous leiomyosarcoma is considered a relatively more benign process with minimal metastatic potential, systemic metastasis is still possible.
[4] In this article, we describe a case of cutaneous leiomyosarcoma of the face that metastasized to the lung.
The differential diagnosis of AFX is focused primarily on poorly differentiated variants of SCC, melanoma, cutaneous leiomyosarcoma, and atypical fibrous histiocytoma.
There are two types of leiomyosarcomas, cutaneous leiomyosarcomas arising from the dartos muscle or errector pilorum, and subcutaneous leiomyosarcomas arising from the muscle lining of arterioles and veins in the subcutaneous tissue.
Leiomyosarcomas are classified as 1 of 3 types according to their origin: leiomyosarcomas of the soft tissues, which are most common (21,22); cutaneous leiomyosarcomas (23); and vascular leiomyosarcomas.