cutaneous anthrax


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to cutaneous anthrax: Bacillus anthracis, pulmonary anthrax

anthrax

 [an´thraks]
an infectious disease seen most often in cattle, horses, mules, sheep, and goats, due to ingestion of spores of Bacillus anthracis. It can be acquired by humans through contact with infected animals or their byproducts, such as carcasses or skins.

Anthrax in humans usually occurs as a malignant pustule or malignant edema of the skin. In rare instances it can affect the lungs if the spores of the bacillus are inhaled, or it can involve the intestinal tract when infected meat is eaten. The condition often is accompanied by hemorrhage, as the exotoxins from the bacillus attack the endothelium of small blood vessels. The condition is treated by the use of antibiotics such as penicillin and the tetracyclines. The malignant edema can be treated with intravenous hydrocortisone. The disorder is also known by a variety of names, including woolsorters' disease, ragpickers' disease, and charbon.
cutaneous anthrax anthrax due to lodgment of the causative organisms in wounds or abrasions of the skin, producing a black crusted pustule on a broad zone of edema.
gastrointestinal anthrax anthrax due to ingestion of poorly cooked meat contaminated with Bacillus anthracis, with deposition of spores in the submucosa of the intestinal tract, where they germinate, multiply, and produce toxin, resulting in massive edema, which may obstruct the bowel, hemorrhage, and necrosis.
inhalational anthrax a usually fatal form of anthrax due to inhalation of dust containing anthrax spores, which are transported to the regional lymph nodes where they germinate, multiply, and produce toxin, and characterized by hemorrhagic edematous mediastinitis, pleural effusions, dyspnea, cyanosis, stridor, and shock. It is usually an occupational disease, such as in persons who handle or sort contaminated wools and fleeces. Antimicrobial prophylaxis is used to prevent the condition. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has published interim guidelines for investigation and response to Bacillus anthracis infection. The evaluation of risk for exposure to aerosolized spores is of highest priority. Obtaining adequate samples, avoiding cross-contamination, and insuring proficient testing and evaluation of test results are all recommended.
meningeal anthrax a rare, usually fatal form of anthrax resembling typical hemorrhagic meningitis due to spread through the bloodstream of Bacillus anthracis from a primary focus of infection; manifestations include cerebrospinal fluid that is hemorrhagic and neurological signs and symptoms.
pulmonary anthrax inhalational anthrax.

cu·ta·ne·ous an·thrax

dermatologic B. anthracis infection produces a characteristic lesion that begins as a papule and soon becomes a vesicle and breaks, discharging a bloody serum; the seat of this vesicle, in about 36 hours, becomes a bluish black necrotic mass; constitutional symptoms of septicemia are severe: high fever, vomiting, profuse sweating, and extreme prostration; the infection is often fatal.
Synonym(s): malignant pustule

cutaneous anthrax

See anthrax.

cu·ta·ne·ous an·thrax

(kyū-tānē-ŭs anthraks)
Dermatologic infection produces a characteristic lesion that begins as a papule and soon becomes a vesicle and breaks, discharging a bloody serum; the seat of this vesicle, in about 36 hours, becomes a bluish black necrotic mass; constitutional symptoms of septicemia are severe: high fever, vomiting, profuse sweating, and extreme prostration; the infection is often fatal.

anthrax

a peracute disease of all animal species, caused by Bacillus anthracis, and characterized by septicemia and sudden death. The causative bacteria form long-living spores which maintain the disease on a farm for many years. Significant necropsy findings include exudation of dark, tarry blood from the body orifices, failure of the blood to clot, absence of rigor mortis and splenomegaly. A dangerous zoonosis. Easily controlled by vaccination of livestock.

alimentary anthrax
infection resulting from the ingestion of animals dead of anthrax. Largely a human manifestation in developing countries.
anthrax belt
regions where anthrax is enzootic, where soil and climate favor persistence of the organism in soil and where routine efforts to control the disease are not sufficient. Outbreaks commonly follow climatic extremes of flood or drought.
cutaneous anthrax
anthrax due to lodgment of the causative organisms in wounds or abrasions of the skin, producing a black crusted pustule on a broad zone of edema. A common form of the disease in humans.
pulmonary anthrax
infection of the respiratory tract resulting from inhalation of dust or animal hair containing spores of Bacillus anthracis; an occupational disease of humans usually affecting those who handle and sort wools and fleeces (woolsorters' disease).
References in periodicals archive ?
For the first time, thirty six cases of human cutaneous anthrax were identified in the remote tribal hamlets like Panasapottu, Goyyagunta, Vennelakota, in Araku Valley Mandal situated 140 km from Visakhapatnam, which is a nonendemic district of Andhra Pradesh.
Cutaneous anthrax of the hand: Some clinical observations.
Our observation suggests that the clinical manifestations of tertiary syphilis may be similar to cutaneous anthrax, and proof of the difficulties faced by the physician in the differential diagnosis of syphilitic gumma with cutaneous anthrax.
Cutaneous anthrax is diagnosed when exudate from skin lesions is swabbed or aspirated and the fluid stained or cultured.
Person-to-person transmission is extremely unlikely and has been reported only with cutaneous anthrax, where discharges from cutaneous lesions are potentially infectious.
Because he worked in the agricultural district of Wollstein, Poland, where wool production was the major industry, most of the cases Koch treated were of what today we call cutaneous anthrax, a painful, coal-black (hence the name "anthrax," from the Latin for "coal") sore on the fingers or hands that resulted from physical contact with the microbes.
The telltale symptom of cutaneous anthrax is a large sore with a black, scabby center.
Cutaneous anthrax, a skin infection, is the most common and is not life-threatening when treated with antibiotics.
Cutaneous anthrax, which infects through a scratch on the skin, accounts for 95 percent of usual cases.
One example of frightening people unnecessarily was the local postal employee who had something on her skin that had the same symptoms as the form of cutaneous anthrax.
Mailroom workers in high-profile office buildings now fit the occupational profile for people at risk for cutaneous anthrax.

Full browser ?