cut point


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cut point

In an analysis of data, a specified value used to sort continuous variables into discrete categories. It may be set according to its usefulness in predicting abnormal clinical events or arbitrarily.

Blood pressure measurements, for example, are continuous variables: in general, the higher one's pressure, the greater one's risk of congestive heart failure, kidney disease, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The analysis of blood pressure measurements has shown that the risk for these events climbs sharply as systolic blood pressures rise above 139 mm Hg. Therefore hypertension is defined by the cut point of 140 mm Hg, even though lower pressures may be harmful for some patients and higher pressures may be relatively well tolerated by a small number of other patients.

See also: point
References in periodicals archive ?
It is not literally a case of a cut point not occurring.
In approximately one-third of the main living areas and 16 % of the infants' beds of homes for which the presence of cockroaches was reported, allergen levels exceeded the upper cut point, whereas allergen levels were almost always below the cut points for homes for which no presence of cockroaches was reported.
Lower and upper cut points of the distributions for Der 1, Fel d 1, and Can f 1 were selected based on levels identified in the literature as potentially related to sensitization (moderate level) or asthma exacerbation (high level).
For education-based indicators, we used percent of area individuals with college degree or higher educational attainment by quartiles (with the lowest quartile representing the worst-off group), as there was no established cut point.
Given that established BMI cut points indicating elevated diabetes risk are inappropriate for Asian Americans, establishing a specific BMI cut point to identify Asian Americans with or at risk for future diabetes would be beneficial to the potential health of millions of Asian American individuals," the position statement concludes.
2 vs no mTBI diagnosis) for reporting "clinical levels" of PTSD symptoms, but this was defined as a cut point [greater than or equal to] 28 on the PCL, which was not crossvalidated for clinical PTSD [15].
Number 5,000, a SuperFine Air Classifier, is a quantum leap in technology with cut points as low as 3 micron it is a cutting edge, ultra-high efficiency classifier, the company said.
Major finding: At one illustrative cut point, the score would have reduced the number of biopsies by 41%, with a negative predictive value of 97%.
This score falls above the cut point corresponding to 100% sensitivity, "so if that was the clinician's practice, that patient would have massive hemorrhage preparations," she said.
The strength of the association with hs-CRP depended on the cut points selected for analysis.
As shown in Figure 6, for instrument to instrument, operator to operator, and run to run, differentially classified cases occur at the cut point and not over the entire distribution.
Screening requires the use of cut points to identify individuals with dyslipidemia.