curve of Spee


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Related to curve of Spee: curve of Wilson

curve

 [kerv]
a line that is not straight, or that describes part of a circle, especially a line representing varying values in a graph.
dose-effect curve (dose-response curve) a graphic representation of the effect caused by an agent (such as a drug or radiation) plotted against the dose, showing the relationship of the effect to changes in the dose.
growth curve the curve obtained by plotting increase in size or numbers against the elapsed time.
oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve a graphic curve representing the normal variation in the amount of oxygen that combines with hemoglobin as a function of the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The curve is said to shift to the right when less than a normal amount of oxygen is taken up by the blood at a given Po2, and to shift to the left when more than a normal amount is taken up. Factors influencing the shape of the curve include changes in the blood pH, Pco2, and temperature; the presence of carbon monoxide; alterations in the constituents of the erythrocytes; and certain disease states.
pulse curve sphygmogram.
Spee curve (curve of Spee) the anatomic curvature of the occlusal alignment of teeth, beginning at the tip of the lower canine, following the buccal cusps of the premolars and molars, and continuing to the anterior border of the ramus.
strength-duration curve a graphic representation of the relationship between the intensity of an electric stimulus at the motor point of a muscle and the length of time it must flow to elicit a minimal contraction; see also chronaxie and rheobase. In cardiac pacing it is useful in determining characteristics of a particular pacing electrode and determining the most efficient selection of pacing parameters for an appropriate safety margin.
survival curve a graph of the probability of survival versus time, commonly used to present the results of clinical trials, e.g., a graph of the fraction of patients surviving (until death, relapse, or some other defined endpoint) at each time after a certain therapeutic procedure.

curve of Spee

(schpā),
the anatomic curvature of the mandibular occlusal plane beginning at the tip of the lower cuspid and following the buccal cusps of the posterior teeth, continuing to the terminal molar.
Synonym(s): von Spee curve

curve of Spee

(kŭrv shpā)
An anatomic curvature determined by the occlusal surfaces of the teeth following the anterior mandibular cusp tips to the buccal cusp tips of the mandibular posterior teeth.
Synonym(s): von Spee curve.

Spee,

Ferdinand Graf von, German embryologist, 1855-1937.
curve of Spee - the anatomic curvature of the mandibular occlusal plane. Synonym(s): von Spee curve
Spee embryo
von Spee curve - Synonym(s): curve of Spee

curve of Spee

(kŭrv shpā)
Anatomic curvature of the mandibular occlusal plane beginning at the tip of the lower cuspid and following the buccal cusps of the posterior teeth, continuing to the terminal molar.
Synonym(s): von Spee curve.
References in periodicals archive ?
A simple correlation analysis between the radius or the depth of the curve of Spee and skeletal facial types was conducted.
Sample size was calculated by using WHO calculator, on the bases of pilot study taking statistics of radius of curve of spee in low angle cases as 63.3333mm+6.05530mm in margin of error 0.969 at confidence of interval 90%, the calculated sample size will be 106.
To determine the mean curve of spee with cephlometric vertical measurements there were two steps: First, determination of the radius of curvature (cephalometric analysis), and to determine the vertical measurements on the Cephlogram.
studied skeletal and dental variables in patients with deep over bite malocclusion and found that deep bite17,18 has multi-factorial etiological causes of which an exaggerated curve of Spee and a decreased gonial angle are the primary contributing factors5.
showed a positive correlation between individuals with higher maxillo-mandibular discrepancies and deeper curve of Spee. Smaller values of ANB like in class I skeletal patterns showed normal to decreased curve of Spee, however with increased values of ANB i.e.
Curve of Spee was measured on study models in millimeters using divider by placing a scale on mandibular occlusal plane touching the incisor and last molar (fig-2).
Andrews8 described the six characteristics of normal occlusion and found that the curve of Spee in subjects with good occlusion ranged from flat to mild, noting that the best intercuspation occurred when occlusal plane was relatively flat.
Orthodontic correction of overbite often involves leveling the curve of Spee by anterior intrusion, posterior extrusion, or a combination of these actions.
Andrews8 described 6 keys to normal occlusion by studying 120 untreated subjects with pleasing appearance and normal occlusion and stated curve of Spee as the sixth key to normal occlusion ranging from flat to mild curve.
Its proper arrangement is critical for fabrication of stable complete dentures.9 Leveling of the excessive curve of Spee inevitably increases arch length as this leads to incisor protrusion unless molars are moved distally, which is difficult.10 Baldridge11 reported that decreasing the depth of the curve of Spee leads to an increase in arch circumference as the lower incisors will procline in direct response.
It was proposed that this unopposed eruption would be expected to be even more exaggerated in a Class II dental or skeletal relationship, leading to excessive deepening of the COS.11 According to study conducted by Veli et al10 the curve of Spee was deepest in Class II Division 1 and Division 2 malocclusion associated with vertical eruption posterior teeth.
Significance of curve of Spee: an orthodontic review, J pharm Bioallied Sci 2012; 4 (Suppl 2): 323-28.