courtesy

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courtesy

Professional courtesy, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
landholders were not left penniless, however, as dower and curtesy
Drobak, George Alexander Madill Professor of Keal Property & Equity Jurisprudence, Washington University School of Law, & Professor of Economics (Curtesy Appointment), School of Arts & Sciences, Washington University.
[section]20.2013-5(b) provides an open-ended definition of "transfers," which includes, but is not limited to, receipts of property: 1) under dower or curtesy; 2) as surviving joint tenant via survivorship rights; 3) as a life insurance beneficiary; 4) as a survivor under an annuity contract; 5) as a donee/possessor of a general power of appointment (GPOA); 6) as appointee under an exercised GPOA; or 7) as a remainder beneficiary under a release or lapse of a power of appointment by reason of which the property is included in the gross estate of the donee of the power under [section]2041.
Scandinavian dramas like Borgen and The Bridge brought it our way, and the arrival of at-home 'hygge' to Northern Ireland, curtesy of Denmark, has made it a real keeper.
Dixon was halted in the second round by 'Iron' Mike Towell at the Lagoon Leisure Centre in Paisley after making an explosive start which saw his opponent crashing to the canvas curtesy of a swinging right hand.
The abolition of the fee tail and the replacement of dower and curtesy by the spousal elective forced share are prominent examples,52 and future interests have acquired a greater degree of alienability.
(1) While the husband did not own her real property, he possessed the use, and if she predeceased him curtesy granted him a life estate, after which it went to their children: J.H.
Ever since the statutory elective share replaced dower and curtesy, courts have been trying to expand the property subject to the spouse's elective share.
Smith, '"To Passe the See in Shortt Space': Mapping the World in the Digby Mary Magdalen," Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England: An Annual Gathering of Research, Criticism and Reviews 18 (2005): 193-214; Jacob Bennett, "The Meaning of the Digby Mary Magdalen',' Studies in Philology 101 (2004): 38-47; Theresa Coletti, Mary Magdalene and the Drama of Saints: Theater, Gender, and Religion in Late Medieval England (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004); Theresa Coletti, '"Curtesy Doth It You Lere': The Sociology of Transgression in the Digby Mary Magdalen," ELH 71 (2004): 1-28; Scott Boehnen, "The Aesthetics of'Sprawling' Drama: The Digby Mary Magdalene as Pilgrims' Play," Journal of English and Germanic Philology 98 (1999): 325-52; Victor I.
[h]e was utterly delighful; had time for each and every one of us; treated us with a delicate curtesy and consideration.
"Tenancy by the Curtesy" in Introduction to the Law of Real Property, ed.
(91) On the state level, common examples of nonnegotiable marital rights and obligations include distinct income tax filing status; public assistance such as health and welfare benefits; default rules concerning community property distribution and control; dower, curtesy and inheritance rights; child custody, child agreements; name change rights; spouse and marital communications privileges in legal proceedings; and the right to bring wrongful death, and other legal actions.