drape

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drape

(drāp),
1. To cover parts of the body other than those to be examined or on which to be operated.
2. The cloth or materials used for such cover.
[M.E., fr. L.L. drappus, cloth]

drape

(drāp)
v.
To cover, dress, or hang with or as if with cloth in loose folds.
n.
A paper or cloth covering placed over a patient's body during medical examination or treatment, designed to provide privacy or a sterile operative field.

drape

Etymology: ME, drap, cloth
a sheet of fabric or paper, usually the size of a small bed sheet, for covering all or a part of a person's body during a physical examination or treatment. drape, v.
noun The sterilised cloths that mark off an operative field
verb To cover and mark off a field before performing a sterile procedure

drape

Surgery verb To cover and mark off a field before performing a sterile procedure

drape

(drāp)
1. To cover parts of the body other than those to be examined or operated on.
2. The cloth or materials used for such cover.
[M.E., fr. L.L. drappus, cloth]

drape

(drāp)
1. To cover parts of the body other than those to be examined or on which to be operated.
2. The cloth or materials used for such cover.
[M.E., fr. L.L. drappus, cloth]

drape

the cloth used to cover the animal for surgery leaving exposed only that part of the body that has been aseptically prepared and is actually required for the surgical procedure. Applying the drapes is called draping.
References in classic literature ?
He was called before the curtain, and with great propriety appeared, leading Hagar, whose singing was considered more wonderful than all the rest of the performance put together.
Although apparently not noticing Albert, he did not, however, lose sight of him, and when the curtain fell at the end of the second act, he saw him leave the orchestra with his two friends.
At the same time he turned round in his ruelle, the curtains of which, in falling, concealed the bed.
It was quite clear that she was not taking her daughter down to be wedded, or the curtains would have been laced home and the guard would have allowed no one near the car.
Indeed, whether on carpets, or curtains, or tapestry, or ottoman coverings, all upholstery of this nature should be rigidly Arabesque.
Then, seeing that nothing happened, and that the light and all outside the tower remained the same, he softly pulled the curtain over the window.
The heavy curtain was drawn now, and it was very dark.
He heard a rustle behind him and a shadow appeared under the curtain of the cot.
He drew the curtain instantly, and she made no attempt to stop him.
His hands were gripping the arms of the stall, his eyes were fixed upon the spot somewhere behind the curtain where this sudden little drama had been played out, as though indeed they could pierce the heavy upholstery and see beyond into the room where the very air seemed quivering still with the vehemence of the woman's outpoured scorn.
There was a movement in the box, and a woman's head and shoulders appeared from behind the curtain.
Next, when the curtain rose on full stage, the dogs were trained to make a great barking.