cursorial


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cursorial

adapted for running, as is, for example, the skeleton of many birds.

cursorial

adapted for running; said of certain birds and bones.
References in periodicals archive ?
We've found that the cursorial spider prefers the cotton fleahopper, which is smaller than the cotton plant bug.
Carabid adults are active, cursorial foragers that opportunistically scavenge, browse tender vegetation, and hunt for invertebrate prey, while larvae are typically carnivorous, pursuing a variety of soft-bodied invertebrates procured from the cover of rocks, rotted logs, and in leaf litter.
The four most abundant spider families in the field-searched samples were the cursorial Gnaphosidae, Lycosidae, and Clubionidae; and the web-building Amaurobiidae, respectively representing 22%, 21%, 18%, and 15% of the spiders found in the Control samples.
On the contrary Ghafoor (2002) collected (54) a great number of specimen belonged to this family during studying the biological impacts of cursorial spiders of cotton fields at Pakistan.
In addition, faster maximum running speeds should enhance their ability to escape from cursorial predators.
birds, wasps, cursorial spiders) may have also reduced web-spider densities, precluding strong interspecific competition and thereby allowing species coexistence without lizards.
The relatively strong growth of the hindlimb during late embryonic development is consistent with a need in hatching and for well-developed cursorial ability in the early posthatching period for the avoidance of predators and for competing with siblings for food.
incanus (Lund, 1840) is arboreal of understory, frequently captured on the ground, but never in the canopy (Cunha and Vieira, 2002; Loretto and Vieira, 2008); Metachirus nudicaudatus (Dermarest, 1817) is essentially terrestrial, the truly cursorial didelphid (Szalay, 1994; Cunha and Vieira, 2002); Micoureus paraguayanus (Moojen, 1943) is an arboreal of the canopy and understory, occasionally captured in the ground (Grelle, 2003; Vieira and Monteiro-Filho, 2003), and Philander frenatus (Olfers, 1818) is semi-terrestrial, occasionally captured in the understory (Cunha and Vieira, 2002).
The affinities, however, of these two species within the genus remain somewhat enigmatic and some unusual morphological features, such as the high clypeus, leg formula of I IV II III and robust appearance due to its relatively short legs, might be related to its preference for cursorial habitats.
Dingoes, like other canids, are swift, cursorial carnivores with a digitigrade stance that kill their prey by a series of shallow, slashing bites (Dayan et al.
Until recently it had been suggested that Archaeopteryx was terrestrial and cursorial, but ranged into the arboreal habitat (Wellnhofer, 1990).