curse


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curse

(kers),
An affliction thought to be invoked by a malevolent spirit.

curse

(kŭrs)
An affliction thought to be invoked by an evil spirit.

curse

(kĕrs)
1. To attempt to inflict injury by appeal to a malevolent supernatural power.
2. Injury assumed to have been inflicted by a malevolent supernatural power.
3. To use foul, offensive language.
References in classic literature ?
The Pope will curse them for their sloth to-day, That slept both Bruno and his crown away.
Bell, book, and candle,--candle, book, and bell,-- Forward and backward, to curse Faustus to hell!
He carried my trespass to his betters; I was stubborn; wherefore, presently upon my head and upon all heads that were dear to me, fell the curse of Rome.
Gentlemen, the Duke does really feel the bitterness about the curse that he uttered just now.
Why doesn't he conceal the family curse better, if he's really so ashamed of it?
I don't suggest you're either more snobbish or more morbid than the rest of us: but don't you feel in a vague way that a genuine old family curse is rather a fine thing to have?
He doesn't conceal his wig, he doesn't conceal his blood, he doesn't conceal his family curse, he doesn't conceal the family crimes--but--"
He really was morbid about it; and it is likely enough that he did invoke it as a kind of curse in the violent scene (which undoubtedly happened) in which he struck Green with the decanter.
At the first they willed To leave the throne to Creon, minded well Thus to remove the inveterate curse of old, A canker that infected all thy race.
OEDIPUS Thy tomb, If disappointed, brings on them a curse.
Every Curse has a blessing and every blessing is a curse.
The elders performed a curse known as 'Uthi' on the culprits.