curriculum

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curriculum

Graduate education
A formal didactic program for teaching a particular subject which, in a residency program (US), includes rotations, conferences, syllabi on assigned reading and areas of emphasis.

Medspeak-UK
A statement of the intended aims and objectives, content, experiences, outcomes and processes of an education and training programme in the UK, including a description of the structure and expected methods of learning, teaching, feedback and supervision. The curriculum should set out what knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours the learner will achieve.

curriculum

Graduate education A formal didactic program for teaching a particular subject which, in a residency program includes rotations, conferences, syllabi on assigned reading and areas of emphasis. See Residency, 2+2 curriculum.

curriculum

(kŭ-rik′yŭ-lŭm) (′yŭ-lă) plural.curriculuaplural.curriculums [L. curriculum, running, a race]
1. A course of study.
2. An outline or summary of available courses of study in an academic discipline, an educational institution, or a particular specialty.

curriculum,

n a course of study; the linked series of academic courses leading to mastery of a discipline.
References in periodicals archive ?
Faculty teaching teams routinely examine: a) course objectives and the link to curricular threads, b) course content, c) schedule, d) teaching-learning strategies, e) evaluation of student performance, f) textbooks and other library holdings, g) student evaluation of the course, and h) validation of Department of Education requirements (i.
Therefore, we conceptualize curricular engagement as the affective, behavioral, and cognitive involvement towards one or more specified sources of engagement.
Rather, a specific goal is to explore what curricular knowledge, as Shulman (1986) describes it, might be in the context of mathematics education where the teacher is a mathematics teacher educator.
As curricular and programming options narrow, and as schools define learning more and more narrowly, fewer and fewer students fit the schools (Eisner, 2001; Moon, Callahan, & Tomlinson, 2003).
With ongoing formative information on each student, classroom, and school, participating professionals are in stronger positions to make better instructional and curricular decisions and accelerate learning.
In a short paper, it is impossible to explore each of these curricular issues in any depth.
Curricular congruence is described as instruction that is carefully planned and mutually supported in both remedial and regular programs in order to provide at-risk students with the content and strategies needed for achieving success in the regular classroom (Sanacore, 1987).
This book confines itself to the fifteenth century in its effort to deny curricular change, even though Black defines Renaissance and humanist as "1400-1600" (xv).
Amato hopes that pointing out these curricular gaps will lead ob-gyn programs to take it upon themselves to expand instruction on issues that are unique to lesbian patients.
She was selected because she had fewer extra curricular responsibilities than the other staff members in the selection pool.
based Co-nect to provide a customized, systematic program of face-to-face and online professional development, assessments, diagnostics and curricular resources to address their School Improvement Plans (SIP).
The celebration includes convocation of the year-2010-11 to 2014-15 besides scientific gathering, postures competition, funfair and other curricular and extra-curricular activities would be organized.