cure

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cure

 [kūr]
1. the course of treatment of any disease, or of a special case.
2. the successful treatment of a disease or wound.
3. a system of treating diseases.
4. a medicine effective in treating a disease.

cure

(kyūr),
1. To heal; to make well.
2. A restoration to health.
3. A special method or course of treatment.
See: dental curing.
[L. curo, to care for]

cure

(kūr)
1. the treatment of any disease, or of a special case.
2. the successful treatment of a disease or wound.
3. a system of treating diseases.
4. a medicine effective in treating a disease.

cure

(kyo͝or)
n.
1. Restoration of health; recovery from disease.
2. A method or course of treatment used to restore health.
3. An agent, such as a drug, that restores health; a remedy.
v.
1. To restore a person to health.
2. To effect a recovery from a disease or disorder.

cure

[kyo̅o̅r]
Etymology: L, cura
1 restoration to health of a person afflicted with a disease or other disorder.
2 the favorable outcome of the treatment of a disease or other disorder.
3 a course of therapy, a medication, a therapeutic measure, or another remedy used in treatment of a medical problem, as faith healing, fasting, rest cure, or work cure.

cure

Materials science
verb To change the state or properties of a substance, as in the curing of a polymer or resin in dentistry.
 
Medspeak
noun Restoration to a usual state of health.
verb To heal, restore to health.
 
Oncology
noun A clinical state characterised by a long-term (often ≥ 5 years, depending on the cancer) absence of cancer-related symptom(s).

Pseudomedicine
noun See Greek cancer cure, Kelley cure.

cure

noun Medtalk Restoration to a usual state of health. See Natural cure verb Medtalk To heal, restore to health.

cure

(kyūr)
1. To heal; to make well.
2. A restoration to health.
3. A special method or course of treatment.
4. Hardening of certain materials with time or by the application of heat, light, or chemical agents, e.g., polymerization of acrylic denture-based material.
[L. curo, to care for]

cure

1. Complete resolution of a disease.
2. The failure to find any indications of a disease, especially cancer, for an arbitrary period, often five years.

cure,

n/v 1. to eliminate illness or disease, to return to a healthy state.
2. elimination or end of symptoms or syndrome. See also direction of cure and healing.

cure

(kyūr)
1. To heal; to make well.
2. A restoration to health.
3. A special method or course of treatment.
[L. curo, to care for]

cure,

n 1. the successful treatment of a disease or wound.
2. a procedure or reaction that changes a plastic material to a hard material (e.g., vulcanization and polymerization). See also process.

cure

1. the course of treatment of any disease, or of a special case.
2. the successful treatment of a disease or wound.
3. a system of treating diseases.
4. a medicine effective in treating a disease.
5. preserve meat by salting, smoking, pickling.

Patient discussion about cure

Q. What is the best natural cure for migraines? Every day I hear something else... would love it if you can share your experience...I'm sick of chemicals:)

A. stay off any products that have a any kind of a caffine content, including chocolate. try this for 3wks, ypu should notice a difference

Q. Cn barret esophagous be cured? I was diagnosed with barretts esophagus several years ago, and so far keeps on the routine follow up. I met some other guy with same condition and he told after his doctor prescribed him with some anti-reflux meds, in the last endoscopy they found normal esophagus, and that he thinks he's now cured. Is that possible?

A. Anti-reflux treatment may lower the risk of cancer a little, but it won't cure it, so there's still a need for refular follow-up.

Q. What is the cure for psoriatic arthritis? I know someone with psoriatic arthritis. What is the cure? Please don't waste my time with anecdotal evidence from anonymous people who drink expensive imported juice and claim to be healed. What treatments and cures are available? What science is behind the remedies?

A. First off, has your friend actually had a biopsy done on the skin to positively confirm the diagnosis? I was diagnosed with the same thing years ago. I then sought a second opinion from a dermatologist who did a biopsy. It wasn't psoriatic arthritis at all. It was Lichen Planus.
If however, it is Psoriatic Arthritis, then I would highly recommend either a Rheumatologist, or a Homeopath/Naturopath. Personally, I prefer the Homeopathic approach. There are no man-made chemicals involved, which our bodies are not designed to assimilate. Introducing an artificial chemical to the human body often times creates an alternate imbalance somewhere else, with its own set of problems.

More discussions about cure
References in periodicals archive ?
It is lovely to have such a special object to enhance our worship," says rector, Richard Steel, "and it is great that it has been funded by money raised from those who knew Tom, including two former curates who have gone on to become Bishops.
I opted instead to curate the best of the tweets, blog posts and photos from the conference, creating a collection that covered all the key comments and additional messages of value (one participant tweeted links to resources the speakers referenced, for instance).
Doctors know better than curates or judges on this.
But who will collect, curate, and preserve the artifacts of our uses of information technologies?
Now he is a humble curate earning just over pounds 14,000 a year.
The scandal has rocked Shotts, in Lanarkshire, where Fr O'Sullivan had been curate at St Patrick's Church about a year.
Michael Brandsma |(new priest) - curate at Holy Trinity Hartshill, St Peters Galley Common and St Mary's Atherstone.
Officers executed warrants at a property on The Coppice and two houses in nearby Curate Road at around 4pm.
He was one of a group of Welsh clergymen in the area, which included his brother David, the curate of Marsden, the Rev Lewis Jones, vicar of Almondbury, and Joseph Hughes, curate of Meltham.
Whereas content creators and distributors were once the titans of content, Rosenbaum argues that those who curate content--finding, organizing and sharing the best and most relevant information--are emerging as the true kings of the content ecosystem.