curariform

cu·ra·ri·form

(kū-rar'i-fōrm),
Denoting a drug having an action like curare.

curariform

[kyoo͡rä′rifôrm′]
Etymology: curare + L, forma
1 chemically similar to curare.
2 having the effect of curare.

curariform

like curare in its action.

curariform drugs
these include d-tubocurarine, gallamine, decamethonium, succinylcholine (suxamethonium). Like curare they cause collapse due to neuromuscular paralysis but without loss of consciousness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Future studies may use a topically applied curariform agent in attempts to induce pupil dilation in American flamingos; vecuronium (32) and rocuronium (33-35) are agents that have proven effective at achieving mydriasis in a variety of avian species.
More pointedly, Alper draws upon the history of animal euthanasia and curariform drugs to argue against the use of pancuronium bromide in the three-drug lethal injection protocol.
61) Also, the Humane Society "expressly condemns the use of curariform drugs like the one used in human lethal injections.
At higher levels, magnesium begins to exert a curariform action at the neuromuscular junction that can result in quadriplegia, respiratory paralysis, and coma.
Presumably its use in Operation Desert Storm would be to protect persons from the effects of a type of nerve gas; it is already approved by FDA for use as an antidote to curariform drugs and gallamine triethoxide, drugs that have toxic effects related to those of the nerve gas in question.
The achievement of mydriasis in conscious birds is only possible by using neuromuscular blocking agents such as curariform drugs.
56) Anesthesiologists hailed the advent of curariform drugs in surgery, because their paralytic properties obviated the need for massive, and potentially dangerous, doses of anesthesia to control unwanted movement.
Certainly the animal welfare community is aware of the dangers of curare and curariform drugs; concerns about those drugs are reflected in both the professional standards of those who perform animal euthanasia, and in the laws and regulations governing animal euthanasia.
Not only does the Humane Society agree with the AVMA that the anesthetic-only procedure is the preferred method for animal euthanasia, but it expressly condemns the use of curariform drugs like the one used in human lethal injections.
Curariform drugs are mentioned only briefly in the AVMA guidelines, and almost always with disapproval.
Even more striking than the fact that veterinary professionals condemn the use of curariform drugs in the euthanasia process is that, as discussed in Part III, the use of such drugs in animal euthanasia is actually illegal in many states that nevertheless continue to use them in human lethal injections.
Excerpt from Florida's recently-revised execution protocol (131) [C]urare, curariform mixtures, [or] any substance which acts as a neuromuscular blocking agent .