curare


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Related to curare: atropine

curare

 [koo-rah´re]
any of a wide variety of highly toxic extracts from various botanical sources, including various species of Strychnos, a genus of tropical trees; used originally as arrow poisons in South America. A form extracted from the shrub Chondodendron tomentosum has been used as a skeletal muscle relaxant.

cu·ra·re

(kū-rah'rē),
An extract of various plants, especially Strychnos toxifera, S. castelnaei, S. crevauxii, and Chondodendron tomentosum, which produces nondepolarizing paralysis of skeletal muscle after intravenous injection by blocking transmission at the myoneuronal junction; indigenous South American hunters of the Amazon and Orinoco regions use arrowheads dipped in curare; curare is used clinically (for example, as d-tubocurarine chloride, metocurine iodide) to relax muscles during surgery. Often classified by the types of vessels in which hunters stored it (for example, pot curare).
Synonym(s): arrow poison (1)
[fr. urarr, Tupí (an indigenous S. Am. language)]

curare

/cu·ra·re/ (koo-rah´re) any of a wide variety of highly toxic extracts from various botanical sources, used originally as arrow poisons in South America. An extract of the shrub Chondodendron tomentosum has been used as a skeletal muscle relaxant.

curare

also

curari

(ko͝o-rä′rē, kyo͝o-)
n.
1. A dark resinous extract obtained from several tropical American woody plants, especially Chondrodendron tomentosum or certain species of Strychnos, used as an arrow poison by some Indian peoples of South America.
2.
a. Any of several purified preparations of such an extract, used formerly as a drug to relax skeletal muscles during anesthesia.
b. The drug tubocurarine.
3. Any of the plants that yield curare.

curare

[kyoo͡rä′rē]
Etymology: S. Am. Indian, ourari
a substance derived from tropical plants of the genus Strychnos. It is a potent neuromuscular blocker that acts by preventing transmission of neural impulses across the myoneural junctions. A large dose can cause complete paralysis, but action is usually reversible with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (cholinergic agonists). Pharmacological preparations of the substance are used as adjuncts to general anesthesia. The use of curare or other neuromuscular blocking agents requires respiratory and ventilatory assistance by a qualified anesthetist or anesthesiologist. Also called tubocurarine chloride.

curare

Anesthesiology A neuromuscular-blocking alkaloid used as an adjuvant in surgical anesthesia for skeletal muscle relaxation and to prevent trauma in electroconvulsive therapy

cu·ra·re

(kyū-rah'rē)
An extract of various plants, especially Strychnos toxifera, S. castelnaei, S. crevauxii, and Chondodendron tomentosum, which produces nondepolarizing paralysis of skeletal muscle after intravenous injection by blocking transmission at the myoneuronal junction; indigenous South American hunters of the Amazon and Orinoco regions use arrowheads dipped in curare; used clinically to relax muscles during surgery.

curare

One of a group of resinous extracts from various South American trees of the genera Chondodendron and Strychnos . It was used as an arrow poison called ‘woorara paste’. Curare acts at the junction between nerves and muscles and produces complete paralysis of all voluntary movement without having any effect on consciousness. See also CURARINE.

curare

a paralysing poison originally extracted from the root of Strychnos toxifera by South American Indians and used on arrowheads. Nowadays it is a valuable source of drugs. Its action in paralysis is to prevent ACETYLCHOLINE depolarizing the postsynaptic membrane, particularly at nerve/ muscle junctions, thus preventing the passage of the nerve impulse and so rendering the victim immobile.

cu·ra·re

(kyū-rah'rē)
An extract of various plants that produces nondepolarizing paralysis of skeletal muscle after intravenous injection by blocking transmission at the myoneuronal junction; used clinically to relax muscles during surgery.

curare

any of a wide variety of highly toxic extracts from various botanical sources, including species of Strychnos, a genus of tropical trees; used originally as arrow poisons in South America. A form extracted from the shrub, Chondrodendron tomentosum, has been used as skeletal muscle relaxant. The active principle is d-tubocurarine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Curare, fruticosum scandens, ramis fuscescenti tomentosis, foliis ovato--oblongis acuminatis reticulato triplinervis glabris, ciliatis petiolo nervoque medio fuscenti--tomentosis.
It is regrettable that we did not mention this and we certainly agree that thiopental and curare were almost as revolutionary as ether.
Although he was only 34 years old, he had accumulated experimental practice: on the chorda tympani (Olmsted and Olmsted, 1952: 34), the action of curare (Changeux, in Robin, 1979: 73-95), he had catheterised the heart to measure the heart blood pressures and the heat production by the lungs (Cournand, in Robin, 1979: 97-121).
Estos incluyen quinina, un extracto del arbol de chinchona empleado para tratar la malaria y la artritis; turbocuarina de las lianas de curare, se administra a los pacientes como un relajante muscular durante la cirugia; y taxol, del arbol de tejo, que se usa para el tratamiento del cancer de mama y ovarico.
These include quinine, an extract of the cinchona tree used to treat malaria and arthritis; turbocuarine from the curare liana vine, given to patients as a muscle relaxant during surgery; and taxol from the yew tree for treating breast and ovarian cancer.
Para conformar este acervo, en diciembre de 2004 se establecio un Comite de Adquisiciones que, teniendo como secretario al director del Programa de Adquisicion de Obra del MUAC, Olivier Debroise (1952-2008), integro a profesionales vinculados con un gremio del sistema artistico nacional que conjunta institucionalidad gubernamental, investigacion y mercado, y esta conformado por Curare (proyecto creado por Debroise), el Patronato Arte Contemporaneo (PAC) y un grupo de artistas neoconceptuales vinculados con el curador Guillermo Santamarina, ahora coordinador curatorial del museo.
Curare interferes with nerve impulses to the skeletal (voluntary) muscles, producing a reversible paralysis.
Asi mismo, de los ninos que iban a la escuela solo un 40% sabia como subirse a un arbol y ninguno sabia preparar veneno de curare, mientras que los ninos no escolarizados podian todos subirse a un arbol y preparar curare.
Con permiso de Dios, curare al ciego de nacimiento y al leproso y resucitare a los muertos.
Sin embargo, en sus avances descubre una serie de relaciones con las plantas psicotropicas en algunas comunidades de ese sector; en el documental se habla de la coca pulverizada, del yage, del curare.
Neuromuscular diseases such as poliomyelitis, Guillain-Barre' syndrome, motor neuron disease, tetanus, botulism, neurotoxins, or curare.
Klinik olasilik puanlarina gore Wells ve Cenevre yonteminin tani degeri Area Under the Curare (AUC) p Wells yontemi ile klinik 0.