culture shock


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

culture shock

n.
A condition of confusion and anxiety affecting a person suddenly exposed to an alien culture or milieu.
A constellation of emotions including a sense of isolation, rejection and alienation which is experienced by a person or group when transplanted from a familiar to an unfamiliar culture—e.g., from one country to another; disorientation and confusion when visiting or relocating to culture different from one’s own

culture shock

Social medicine Feelings of isolation, rejection and alienation experienced by a person or group when transplanted from a familiar to an unfamiliar culture–eg, from one country to another; disorientation and confusion when visiting or relocating to culture different from one's own
References in periodicals archive ?
Ward, C., Bochner, S., Furnham, A., (2005), The Psychology of Culture Shock. 2nd edition.
As the paper will illustrate, this is key in thinking about culture shock. As Oberg (1960) highlights, culture shock as a psychological disorder is caused by the loss of the habitual, the everyday know-how of the migrant, routines such as eating, shopping and driving that they are used to at 'home'.
perceived that they did or did not experience culture shock. The discovery process was also to have participants discuss their reasons for why they thought they had or had not experienced culture shock.
"The cult's ideology precisely parallels the ideology behind Oberg's culture shock model: cultural relativism, cultural determinism and stoicism."
When we are placed out of our comfort zone, the phenomenon of culture shock may occur.
The unifying theme of these eight essays exploring US-Japanese relations is the concept of culture shock. Asada (emeritus, diplomatic history, Hoshisha U., Japan) believes that cultural misunderstandings have characterized relations between the two countries from the entry of Commodore Perry into the Uraga Channel to the present day.
A spokeswoman for the authority admitted Derby's drivers had suffered "a culture shock".
Maybe the worst culture shock for these guys is hailing from a background where the family, the Catholic faith, and the priesthood are revered, and arriving in a parish where there's no need for regular Mass attendance, Church authority, or even the priesthood.
Culture shock: Whibley, who also serves as an obstetrician and gynecologist in the community, joined the school board seven years ago and attributes the district's success to a change in culture that stressed accountability at all levels and the use of data-driven decision making.
Unfortunately, Marjane experienced culture shock and found it difficult to fit in.
It was quite a culture shock to go from seven days of feeling free with my sea gals to plunging into Italian art and commerce.
Luke Cardasian spent the last six years of his life in Limbasa and much of his life before that overseas, so the liberated American media is culture shock. He came home to help his brother with the family business following his father's recent heart attack, but the Midnight Ryder show discussing erection shocks his senses, especially since the host is female.