cuff


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cuff

(kŭf),
Any structure with a gap that nearly encircles some extension or outgrowth, thus, anything shaped like a cuff.

cuff

(kŭf)
n.
1. A bandlike structure encircling a part.
2. An inflatable band, usually wrapped around the upper arm, that is used along with a sphygmomanometer in measuring arterial blood pressure.

cuff

(kŭf)
Any structure with a gap that nearly encircles some extension or outgrowth, thus, anything shaped like a cuff.
References in periodicals archive ?
* If you selected a tapered jean (like those found in skinny jeans), begin measuring at the point the cuff will be attached to the leg (A).
What then does our general inaction with respect to cuff pressure management say about our attitude to it?
"Chronic tears often result in fat accumulation within the rotator cuff muscles, resulting in negative clinical outcomes, including weakening and atrophy of the muscles," said Manuel Schubert of Michigan Medicine.
The objective of this study was to assess, if cuff HTN is present in obese subjects.
These devices had a steady rate of cuff deflation and were not affected by a noisy environment as they did not require a stethoscope and were not based on auscultation.
The European Society of Hypertension Practice Guidelines for home blood pressure monitoring recommend that the cuff should be wrapped around the upper arm with its inflatable bladder centered on the arm anterior surface (most cuffs have an indication of proper placement) with the lower edge of the cuff approximately 2 - 3cm above the bend of the elbow.
"Corticosteroid injections are frequently utilized in the nonoperative management of rotator cuff tears," researchers led by Sophia A.
If the cuff pressure is maintained at 25 mmHg or less, it ensures adequate seal to prevent aspiration as well as maintains mucosal perfusion.
The senior resident could not insert a cuffed Mallinckrodt[R] ETT (ID, 5.0 mm; OD, 6.9 mm; deflated cuff portion, 8.4 mm; Mallinckrodt, Dublin, Ireland, Figure 2a) because of resistance at the level of the glottic opening.
Another possibility is that you have an abnormal heart rhythm--these can essentially "fool" monitors with automatic cuffs. You don't say what type of cuff your monitor has, but also keep in mind that wrist and finger monitors are less accurate.
Rotator cuff injury covers up to 70% of shoulder problems in orthopedic practices.