cue

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cue

(kyū),
In conditioning and learning theory, a pattern of stimuli to which an individual has learned or is learning to respond.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cue

(kyo͞o)
n.
Psychology A stimulus, either consciously or unconsciously perceived, that elicits or signals a type of behavior.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

CUE

Abbreviation for:
Community Unit for the Elderly (Medspeak-UK)
confidential unit exclusion
cumulative urinary excretion
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cue

Psychology Any sensory stimulus that evokes a learned patterned response. See Conditioning.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cue

(kyū)
In conditioning and learning theory, a pattern of stimuli to which an individual has learned or is learning to respond.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
If you give your dog no hand signals or body-language clues when you use your verbal cue for a behavior, will she know what you want and comply?
Experiment 1: prey (tadpole) space use.--The prey experiment measured the spatial response of two size classes of tadpoles exposed to five treatments of chemical cues. The size classes were: 50 mg (40-60 mg) and 150 mg (100-200 mg).
It is worth emphasizing that the cues are, at best, probabilistically related to deception rather than necessarily or invariably linked to deception.
Chung, "The effects of visual and auditory cues on freezing of gait in patients with Parkinson disease," American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, vol.
Hypothesis 3: Highly rejection-sensitive individuals will display different attentional characteristics toward threat cues in explicit rejection situations from the characteristics they display toward threat cues in ambiguous rejection situations.
When [s.sub.a] needs to cue other sensors, if there are several sensors which can be cued, [s.sub.a] chose the cued sensor based on the probability p(B).
BVS also said CUES knew its representations were false or reckless because CUES' corporate structure and practice did not allow for the type of relationship CUES promised to BVS.
Table 1 Condition orders for pigeons in Experiment I with number of sessions per condition in parentheses Pigeon 301 302 303 304 Red Only (2) Red Only (2) Red Only (6) Red Only (2) Guiding Guiding Cues ( 14) Guiding Cues ( Guiding Cues ( 2) 5) Cues (5) Reversed Cues (5) Red Only (4) Reversed Cues (5) Guiding Cues (5) No Cues (5) Results Figure 2 shows the percentage of L-R response sequences and R-L response sequences during the last five sessions of the Guiding-Cues condition and all five sessions of the second condition for each pigeon.
In the relationship between pathological anxiety and the attentional networks, the results seem to show that anxiety disorders are related to both reduced effectiveness of the executive control network and difficulty in disengaging attention from invalid cues, irrespective of the valence of the affective signal (Pacheco-Unguetti, Acosta, Callejas, & Lupianez, 2010).
Don't become impatient if they seem slow to learn; they must become familiar and comfortable with what you want them to do; they need to learn the first cues before you move on to the next.
Participants were informed that the color singleton cues could only appear at the four lateral positions on the screen and that the position of the second or saccade singleton cue was independent of the position of the first singleton cue.