cue

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cue

(kyū),
In conditioning and learning theory, a pattern of stimuli to which an individual has learned or is learning to respond.

cue

(kyo͞o)
n.
Psychology A stimulus, either consciously or unconsciously perceived, that elicits or signals a type of behavior.

cue

[kyo̅o̅]
a stimulus that determines or may prompt the nature of a person's response.

CUE

Abbreviation for:
Community Unit for the Elderly (Medspeak-UK)
confidential unit exclusion
cumulative urinary excretion

cue

Psychology Any sensory stimulus that evokes a learned patterned response. See Conditioning.

cue

(kyū)
In conditioning and learning theory, a pattern of stimuli to which an individual has learned or is learning to respond.

cue,

n a stimulus that determines or may prompt the nature of a person's response.
References in periodicals archive ?
13% fewer errors for cued than uncued trials) when no fixation cue was presented, while IOR emerged (8.
According to the authors, the role of the fixation cue "is consistent with its putative role in reorienting attention away from the cued location".
2001), participants maintained attention at the cued location, even though the cue was not spatially informative about the location of the target.
A similar Cue-target integration process has also been proposed to account for the finding of a reduction of Spatial Stroop on cued tfials (Funes & Lupianez, 2003; Funes, Lupiafiez & Milliken, 2007; Lupiafiez & Funes, 2005).
In this case, we expected to replicate the results found in those experiments, that is, large and long lasting facilitation effects as well asa reduction of Spatial Stroop on cued trials.
The target appeared inside the box at the previously cued location on half the trials, and inside the box opposite the cued location on the other half.
Not surprisingly, cued targets were detected faster than were uncued targets, with enhanced cuing benefits when participants used the HMD.
Although the head-up presentation of data on the HMD provided faster detection for cued targets, the clutter produced by the symbology in the forward field of view proved to be costly in the detection of low-salience targets, particularly when they were uncued.
To illustrate the use of the TDOA model, let us consider an observer who in a particular picture detected three targets, one of which was cued and two of which were not cued, and three false alarms.
By comparing occurrences in which the targets are cued with occurrences in which the targets are not cued, we are able to see how the cuing of targets or false alarms affects the order in which the targets are detected.
01, but was detrimental only on cued trials, F(1, 12) = 5.
a truck or tree) were cued on 25% of the cued trials, and the implementation of this manipulation resulted in the cuing of all trucks and trees present in the scene.