cuckold

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cuckold

noun An older term for a man whose wife has been unfaithful.
 
verb To commit adultery on one’s husband; as in, to make a cuckold of one’s husband.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, she surmises from Baccio s black chalk drawings that becco, the Italian for goat and cuckold, also refers to a bird's beak as a 'pecker'.
This focus on the audience brings me back to my overarching concern about the dance of the cuckolds and the audience.
The whole theatricality of meaning in Wycherley's world is on display in the image of the dance of the cuckolds. Through it, the audience discover that they have been the cuckolds of the play, thinking themselves Horners when they are in fact Pinchwifes, and that this cuckolding is not only in the theater but outside it as well.
(3) Rose Zimbardo sees the dance of the cuckolds as a parody of the "Hymeneal blessing of the green world comedies of Shakespeare" in "Wycherley: The Restoration Juvenal," Forum 17 (1979): 17-26 (24).
(2) A reference to the cuckold's traditional pair of horns.
your loved one will forsake you, and you will be called a cuckold. This remark is founded on the fact that the O.F.
The poem's most recent editor agrees, and refers us to other examples of the pun on cuckoo and cuckold.(3)
Pinchwife's claim of "knowingness" reveals his suspicion that all married men threaten to become cuckolds. Pinchwife seems to have granted some horns in his youth and must now take extraordinary steps to avoid receiving them.
Douglas Canfield points out, the hierarchical dynamics in this play become most clear through comparison to the more typical cuckolding plots of this period, such as in The London Cuckolds, where city gallants use their superior worldliness to outmaneuver the less refined husbands.
The show offers all the ingredients of a classic Restoration farce, three beautiful wives, three ludicrous husbands and one overly-ambitious rake who leaves behind him a trail of cuckolded husbands.
Students of the Dutch language may find it interesting that whereas Renaissance authors such as Constantijn Huygens use "koeckoeck" alternately in the sense of cuckold and adulterer, Erasmus was evidently unfamiliar with the latter use in his mother tongue.(31) (Had he known it, he would have certainly brought it up in his discussions about the word "cuculus.")
32): "Men Spot metten cochuyt ende cucurra" ("One mocks the cuckold and the |cucurra'").