cubeb


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Related to cubeb: cubeb cigarette

cu·beb

(kyū'beb),
The dried unripe, nearly full-grown fruit of Piper cubeba (family Piperaceae), a climbing plant of the West Indies, used as stimulant, carminative, and local irritant; cubeb oil has been used as a mild urinary antiseptic.
[Ar. and Hindu, kababa]

cubeb

(kyo͞o′bĕb′)
n.
1. A tropical southeast Asian shrubby vine (Piper cubeba) having spicy, berrylike fruits, heart-shaped leaves, and small flowers in cylindrical spikes.
2. The dried, unripe, berrylike fruit of this plant, used in perfumery, pharmaceuticals, and commercial flavorings.
References in periodicals archive ?
Being a slave's slave, it was me who'd sometimes stuff the cubeb in, then hand the pipe to her, and she'd light it, then give it to the senor.
Though once I heard him say, "You're as spicy as cubeb, eh?
Captures of Xyleborus glabratus in Lindgren traps baited with cubeb oil lures and diagnosis of laurel wilt symptoms in sassafras trees during surveys of 16 sites in Union, Claiborne, and Lincoln Parishes, Louisiana, from 29 Sep to 15 Oct 2014.
Grind the pink peppercorns and cubeb berries until very fine.
Dishes such as the North Sea halibut is served with a medieval "pevreat" sauce made from cubebs (a pepper), and dishes such as the confit duck which includes "drawen benes" - a dish of fava beans, grains of paradise, garlic and saffron.
Add mace, cloves and cubebs and serve it forth.) [Compare f.
In the better-off kitchens, cooks were regularly using ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, galingale, cubebs, coriander, cumin, cardamom and aniseed, resulting in highly spiced cooking very similar to India.
The urine of patients taking certain vegetable substances, such as copaiba or cubebs, becomes cloudy with nitric acid, but unlike albumin the cloudiness does not subside.
By about AD200 the route extended east as far as the Spice Islands (the Moluccas, in eastern Indonesia) by which time a wealth of wondrous eastern aromas was reaching world markets: cloves, nutmeg, cubebs, cinnamon, cardamoms, black pepper, turmeric, frankincense, myrrh, balsam of Mecca, aloeswood, sandalwood and spikenard.
Cloves and nutmeg from the Molucca Islands, cubebs from Java and Panang, cinnamon from Ceylon, peppercorns from Malabar were all gathered by Chinese traders, exchanged for goods from the Indians, and then traded further along in their westward journey to the Arabs.
In a list of aromatic materials, in which musk and camphor are most prominent, the final entry, following nutmegs, cubebs, and cloves, is javadi (Bhojanakutuhala of Raghunatha: 120-21):