cryptography


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

cryptography

(krip-tog′ră-fē) [ crypt- + -graphy]
The science and techniques of concealing or disguising information through encoding and decoding. In the health professions cryptography is used to ensure the confidentiality of medical records.
References in periodicals archive ?
Established in 2015, the Levchin Prize for Real-World Cryptography recognizes up to two groups or individuals annually who have made significant advances in the practice of cryptography and its use in real-world systems.
NSA also tried, unsuccessfully, to force the private sector to use a hardware device called "Clipper" for all cryptography.
Public key cryptography performance is significantly enhanced by using special instructions, while elliptic curve cryptography algorithms can utilize new non-arithmetic instructions.
That war has been largely unpublicized, in part because the general public has yet to deem cryptography policy a matter of central concern.
Thus, it is a false dichotomy to characterize the debate over national cryptography policy as a tradeoff between the government's interests in law enforcement and national security and the nongovernment information security needs of businesses and individuals.
In the past, government officials have tended to treat many aspects of cryptography policy as top secret," Dam says.
But anyone looking for a practical, usable book about implementing cryptography will find a definitive resource here.
Quantum cryptography offers an ideal mechanism for handling secret keys.
We are pleased to see Athena's efforts to develop DPA-resistant hardware cores tailored to the anti-tamper needs of our DPA countermeasure technology licensees," said Pankaj Rohatgi, technical director, hardware security solutions at Cryptography Research, Inc.
Cryptography is one of the central components of information security.
The increasing use of public-key cryptography in commercial dealings on computer networks has now focused new attention on these concerns.
We grant that there are some number of people who would use cryptography to further illegal acts, but should we compromise the privacy of all American citizens just to do an ineffective job of trying to police terrorists and mobsters?
Full browser ?