generalized tonic-clonic seizure

(redirected from cryptogenic epilepsy)

seizure

 [se´zhur]
1. the sudden attack or recurrence of a disease.
2. a convulsion or attack of epilepsy.
absence seizure the seizure seen in petit mal epilepsy, marked by a momentary break in the stream of thought and activity, accompanied by a symmetrical spike and wave at 3 cycles per second on the electroencephalogram. Called also petit malseizure. See epilepsy.
atonic seizure an absence seizure characterized by sudden loss of muscle tone.
complex partial seizure see partial seizure.
febrile seizure febrile convulsion.
focal seizure partial seizure.
focal motor seizure a simple partial seizure consisting of clonus or spasm of a muscle or muscle group, occurring either singly or in a continuous repetitive series.
generalized tonic-clonic seizure (grand mal seizure) the seizure seen in grand mal epilepsy, marked by loss of consciousness and generalized tonic convulsions followed by clonic convulsions. See epilepsy.
jackknife s's infantile spasms.
myoclonic seizure one characterized by a brief episode of myoclonus.
partial seizure any seizure due to a lesion in a specific, known area of the cerebral cortex; symptoms vary with different lesion locations. A simple partial seizure is the most localized type, with a discharge that is predominantly one-sided or presents localized features without loss of consciousness. A complex partial seizure is associated with disease of the temporal lobe and characterized by varying degrees of impairment of consciousness. See epilepsy.
petit mal seizure absence seizure.
reflex seizure (sensory seizure) an epileptic seizure in response to a sensory stimulus, which may be tactile, visual, auditory, or musical.
simple partial seizure see partial seizure.
tonic-clonic seizure see generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

gen·er·al·ized ton·ic-clo·nic sei·zure

a generalized seizure characterized by the sudden onset of tonic contraction of the muscles often associated with a cry or moan, and frequently resulting in a fall to the ground. The tonic phase of the seizure gradually give way to clonic convulsive movements occurring bilaterally and synchronously before slowing and eventually stopping, followed by a variable period of unconsciousness and gradual recovery.

generalized tonic-clonic seizure

Generalized seizure, grand mal seizure, tonic-clonic seizure Neurology A seizure of the entire body, characterized by muscle rigidity, violent rhythmic contractions, and loss of consciousness, with abnormal electric activity in neurons; GCTS may occur in anyone at any age, as a single episode or as a repeated, chronic condition–epilepsy, and are caused by abnormal electrical activity at multiple locations in the brain, or over most of the brain, which may be accompanied by changes in mental status–alertness, awareness and/or focal neurologic Sx Etiology Idiopathic, congenital defects and perinatal, metabolic defects, DM complications, electrolyte imbalances, kidney failure, uremia, nutritional deficiencies, PKU, alcohol or drugs, brain injury, tumors and space occupying lesions–eg, hematomas

gen·er·al·ized ton·ic-clo·nic sei·zure

, generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy (jen'ĕr-ă-līzd ton'ik-klon'ik sē'zhŭr, ep'i-lep'sē)
A generalized seizure characterized by the sudden onset of tonic contraction of the muscles often associated with a cry or moan, and frequently resulting in a fall to the ground. The tonic phase of the seizure gradually gives way to clonic convulsive movements occurring bilaterally and synchronously before slowing and eventually stopping, followed by a variable period of unconsciousness and gradual recovery.
Synonym(s): grand mal.

gen·er·al·ized ton·ic-clo·nic sei·zure

, generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy (jen'ĕr-ăl-īzd ton'ik-klon'ik sē'zhŭr, ep'i-lep'sē)
Seizure characterized by sudden onset of tonic contraction of muscles often associated with a cry or moan, and frequently resulting in a fall.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Symptomatic or cryptogenic epilepsy without severe mental or physical disability (severe mental delay, cerebral palsy, neurodegenerative disorders, etc.
Undertaking surgery is a much more difficult decision in patients with cryptogenic epilepsy, i.
A 16-year-old student from Dhahran Ahliyya School in Dhahran, Mohammed Aldajani, also received the $ 500 prize, for coming in fourth in the category of medicine and health science for conducting research on establishing a novel pathophysiology of autism and cryptogenic epilepsy.
Thus, in this cross sectional study, we aimed to investigate the hipotalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, insulin resistance, in addition to the prevalence of PCOS in patients with generalized idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy receiving VPA and CBZ.
The prevalence of PCOS among women with idiopathic and cryptogenic epilepsy under VPA or CBZ treatment is higher than expected.
A total of 122 patients had idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy and 123 had "remote symptomatic epilepsy" associated with a major neurologic abnormality or insult.
1 deaths per 1,000 person-years) than in those with cryptogenic epilepsy (2.
Cognitive test findings from 40 patients with neurocysticercosis were compared with those of 49 normal controls from the same regional population, as well as with data on 28 patients with cryptogenic epilepsy experiencing similar rates of seizure frequency and antiepileptic drug use, according to Dr.
Cognitive test findings from 40 patients with neurocysticercosis were compared with those of 49 normal controls from the same regional population, as well as with 28 patients with cryptogenic epilepsy experiencing similar rates of seizure frequency and antieplleptic drug use.
One woman with premature ovarian failure had posttraumatic epilepsy; four had cryptogenic epilepsy.
Idiopathic, Epilepsy-Related (IE-R): CSE in a child, with a prior diagnosis of idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy or when the episode of CSE is the second unprovoked seizure that has led to a diagnosis of epilepsy.