cryptogam

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Related to cryptogamic: Cryptogamic plants

cryptogam

(in obsolete classification schemes) any plant that does not produce seeds, i.e. plants placed in the groups Thallophyta, Bryophyta and Pteridophyta. Whereas in conifers and flowering plants (Phanerogamia) the organs of reproduction are prominent, they are not so in the Cryptogamia - hence the name (‘secret marriage’).
References in periodicals archive ?
Uredinales collected in the Swat Valley, Pakistan," Cryptogamic flora of Pakistan, Nat.
Effects of cryptogamic soil crust on the population dynamics of Arabis fecunda (Brassicaceae).
Cryptogamic Soil Crusts in the Deserts of North America.
For instance, in the US's desert southwest, mosses, lichens, and soil microorganisms form a fragile crust, known as cryptogamic soft, which retains water and inhibits erosion in that arid environment.
All that changed when Dr Fred Rumsey (above) of the Cryptogamic Plants Division at the Natural History Museum found some tiny brown spores.
Crusher describes as a cryptogamic parasite with telepathic abilities.
Vehicle movement has denuded the area of vegetation other than large ([is greater than] 1 m tall) shrubs and trees and has removed cryptogamic crust, resulting in compaction of sandy soil into roads, trails, and large open spaces.
Unwittingly contradicting his long-standing argument for an all-encompassing approach, he observed that it had become impossible for one person to teach both vertebrate and invertebrate morphology, or to handle both phaenogamic and cryptogamic botany.
In arid environments, cattle have especially insidious effects because they reduce native grasses and their hooves break open the thin cryptogamic crust that anchors native plants and serves as a protective layer against wind and water erosion.
187 A dark crust, known as cryptogamic soil, consisting of moss, algae, and lichens, covers the sandy areas of the Arches National Park in Utah (United States).
Actylene reduction by cryptogamic crusts from a blackbrush community as related to resaturation and dehydration.
Processes at this scale that impact soil erodibility and that are potentially impacted by changing environmental conditions include biological activity, both floral (such as vegetation cover or development of cryptogamic crusts [Yair 1990; Chartres 1992]) and faunal (such as burrowing animals [Butler 1995]) and physical degradation (surface sealing, crusting, compaction).