cryptitis

cryptitis

 [krip-ti´tis]
inflammation of a crypt.
anal cryptitis inflammation of the mucous membrane of the anal crypts.

cryp·ti·tis

(krip-tī'tis),
Inflammation of a follicle or glandular tubule, particularly in the colon.

cryp·ti·tis

(krip-tī'tis)
Inflammation of a follicle or glandular tubule, particularly in the rectum.
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(6, 7) Kotanagi et al (8) found that recurrence of CD at the anastomotic site did not correlate with any histologic features at the resection margin, including pyloric gland metaplasia, fibrosis, cryptitis, crypt abscesses, ulcers, granulomas, or transmural inflammation.
Twenty (71.4%) out of 28 duodenal biopsies were positive (chronic active duodenitis in 17 patients while ulceration, superficial mucosal necrosis, heavy infiltrates in lamina propria, mild excess in plasma cells, cryptitis, focal crypt abscess, and crypt hyperplasia each in one patient).
Multiple biopsy samples were taken from the colon--they revealed severe chronic colitis with focal areas of ulceration, focal cryptitis, and architectural distortion.
Endoscopic features such as cryptitis and crypt abscesses, as well as erosions and ulceration of the rectum, which are commonly seen in ulcerative colitis, may also be present in amebic colitis [25, 44].
Final pathology from the cecal biopsy specimens showed chronic active colitis with cryptitis, ulceration, and architectural distortion (Figure 3).
Normal 0 Enterocyte loss Loss of single cell 1 Loss of groups of cells 2 Frank ulceration 3 Normal 0 Crypt Single inflammatory cell 1 inflammation Cryptitis 2 Crypt abscess 3 Normal 0 Lamina propria Slight increase 1 mononuclear cells Moderate increase 2 Marked increase 3 Normal 0 Neutrophils Slight increase 1 Moderate increase 2 Marked increase 3 Normal 0 Epithelial Mild 1 hyperplasia Moderate 2 Pseudopolyp 3 Table 2: Gene sequences of primers in the present study.
There was no cryptitis or crypt abscess, and no granuloma or parasites were seen.
The mucosal biopsy specimens revealed glandular distortion and cryptitis with crypt abscess (Figure 2), which were compatible with UC.
Biopsies of the affected colon showed mucosal inflammation, characterized by focal infiltration of neutrophils, cryptitis and crypt abscess, and non-necrotizing granulomas composed of epithelioid histiocytes.
Common organic causes include cryptitis, anal fissure, perianal abscess (with or without fistula), hemorrhoids, solitary rectal ulcer, inflammatory bowel disease, and rectal ischemia (Figure 3).
Pathology of the sigmoid ulcer biopsy revealed focal active colitis with cryptitis, crypt abscesses, and mild stromal lymphoplasmacytic inflammation.
Histological examination in strongyloidiasis reveals edema and infiltration of the lamina propria by lymphocytes, plasma cells and eosinophils, blunted villi, cryptitis, and crypt hyperplasia, which are also common findings in IBD [8, 9, 11].