encryption

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en·cryp·tion

(en-krip'shŭn)
The scrambling of electronic information being stored and sent so that if someone wrongly receives such information it will not be readable.
References in periodicals archive ?
His love of music and the intricacies of cryptanalysis went hand in hand as the mathematical connection between the two is strong.
Much of these courses was based on Friedman's six-volume series of Military Cryptanalysis textbooks.
Turing's utility as the brains of an important part of the wartime British cryptanalysis operation run out of Bletchley Park kept him on the government's payroll and out of the hands of the law during the war.
22 shows that encrypting message signal with two hyper-chaotic signals makes the encryption stronger, hence not easily broken by power spectrum analysis and low pass filter method of cryptanalysis attack.
After a cryptanalysis phase ranging over 4 years, stream ciphers were filtered in 3 phases by their performance and security.
These requirements are summarized by two questions: how secure is the generated keystream against cryptanalysis attacks and how strong is the generated keystream statistically?
Cryptanalysis and the Hiss case' in Intelligence and National Security (18:3 Autumn 2003) and 'In Re Alger Hiss: A Final Verdict from the Archives of the KGB', in Journal of Cold War Studies (11:3 Summer 2009), the latter forming part of a special issue containing approving assessments of the Vassiliev notebooks.
If the key is truly random, an XOR-based one-time pad is perfectly secure against cipher text-only cryptanalysis.
Such cryptanalysis by professional scholar-programmers who can account for all letter shifts will take the young science of Edenics to another level.
Nimitz directed the preliminaries because only his staff had the latest information from cryptanalysis, because he would have direct scouting reports from long-range PBY seaplanes and B-17 bombers; because he alone of the three could influence the attacks from, and defense of, Midway Island; and because TFs 16 and 17 had to keep radio silence until the Japanese discovered their presence.
A Cambridge undergraduate who was recruited in 1943, Stripp not only had to learn the principles of cryptanalysis in quick time, but also get his head round the intricacies of the Japanese language and alphabet.
Thus making the design of cryptographic schemes that can counter new cryptanalysis techniques is becoming harder.