cryosurgery


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cryosurgery

 [kri″o-ser´jer-e]
destruction of tissue by application of extreme cold; silver nitrate and solid carbon dioxide are commonly used. Uses include treatment of certain malignant lesions of the skin and mucous membranes, early removal of malignant lesions of the uterine cervix, and treatment of tumors that cannot be handled with traditional surgical techniques.

cry·o·sur·ger·y

(krī'ō-ser'jer-ē),
An operation using freezing temperature (achieved by liquid nitrogen or carbon dioxide) as an independent agent or in an instrument to destroy tissue.

cryosurgery

(krī′ō-sûr′jə-rē)
n.
The selective exposure of tissues to extreme cold, often by applying a probe containing liquid nitrogen, to bring about the destruction or elimination of abnormal cells.

cry′o·sur′geon (-jən) n.
cry′o·sur′gi·cal (-jĭ-kəl) adj.

cryosurgery

Ambulatory surgery A technique that uses liquid nitrogen to freeze and destroy malignancy–eg, CA of uterine cervix, prostate CA. Cf Cone biopsy, Radical prostatectomy Cardiology A technique used to modify AV node conduction in Pts with treatment-refractory AV node reentrant tachycardia See Cryotherapy.

cry·o·sur·gery

(krī'ō-sŭr'jĕr-ē)
An operation using freezing temperatures (achieved by liquid nitrogen or carbon dioxide) to destroy tissue.

cryosurgery

Controlled tissue destruction by low temperatures, usually by means of cryoprobes by which cold can be applied with precision. The method is used in the treatment of PARKINSON'S DISEASE, cancer of the PROSTATE and other organs, RETINAL DETACHMENT and CATARACT removal.

Cryosurgery

In prostatectomy, the use of a very low-temperature probe to freeze and thereby destroy prostatic tissue.
Mentioned in: Keloids, Prostatectomy

cry·o·sur·gery

(krī'ō-sŭr'jĕr-ē)
An operation using freezing temperature (achieved by liquid nitrogen or carbon dioxide) to destroy tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
The advantages of cryosurgery over the conventional method make it an important asset in the armamentarium of an oral surgeon and have additional advantages of maintaining vestibular depth, controlling pain and perhaps dealing with lesions in sites that would be difficult to treat by other means.
Based on the similar results of scar morphology with each method, cryosurgery is as efficient as conventional surgery for causing HS formation.
In cryosurgery group, younger lesions (5 years) showed 16.6% excellent results, 41.7% good results and 41.7% poor response.20
(27) An ex vivo study of skin derived from Fitzpatrick skin type V suggested that, compared with cryosurgery HP40 is associated with less cytotoxicity and greater melanocyte viability.
We presently report the feasible and efficacious treatment of relatively large BD lesions (20-70mm in maximal diameter) with 4-day cryosurgery-ingenol mebutate combination consisting of an initial cryosurgery session followed by 4 daily ingenol mebutate applications.
According to operative reports, cryosurgery was used in 12 patients, between 1999 and 2007.
Given the wide applicability of cryosurgery in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery, we report a case of hemangioma of the oral cavity successfully treated with cryosurgery.
Cryosurgery, like other curative treatments, can cause side effects, and its success depends largely on the skill of the physician.
Conclusion: Our study concludes that cryosurgery is more effective than submucosal diathermy in terms of relief of nasal obstruction caused by hypertrophied inferior turbinates.
Cryosurgery and curettage cryosurgery for basal cell carcinomas of the mid-face.
In my own practice, I was initially very reluctant to embark on salvage cryosurgery because of the risk of significant complications.
Numerical simulation of 3D freezing and heating problem for combined cryosurgery and hyperthermia therapy.