cryonics


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cryonics

(krī-ŏn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The process of freezing and storing the body of a diseased, recently deceased person to prevent tissue decomposition so that at some future time the person might be brought back to life upon development of new medical cures.

cry·on′ic adj.

cryonics

The placing of a dead person or his or her head/brain in a frozen state, based on the hope that when medical science advances to the point of regenerating tissues and curing the disease that caused the person’s death, the person will be brought back from a state of supposed suspended animation and continue with his or her life. Brain tissue undergoes irreversible changes at death; there is no scientific data to support the claim that rejuvenation is possible.

cryonics

Freezing and storing the human body soon after death to preserve it indefinitely, in the hope that future scientific advances will allow correction of the process that caused the death, so that life can be restored.
References in periodicals archive ?
bemused with feature ("My frozen so in cryonics, preserving I the it Then I that it was by a Trump of that for doing doubt becomes his "appoint a Surely, acceptance that we eventually die is a sign of maturity Laurence Irwin Ely
"I went to a couple of meetings, got in touch with one of cryonics providers in the US, and eventually I thought: 'I don't think it will work, but what have I got to lose?' "Ten years ago I would say to you it's a heck of a long shot.
In cryonics, AI applications may, via wearables, warn a patient's cryonics organization of the impending death of that patient.
If Disney had been the first it would have made headlines around the world and been a real shot in the arm for cryonics. But that's the way it goes.'"
Boss Tim Gibson, who has no medical training, said: "Why would you put an age limit on it?" But the father of the British girl who won a legal battle to undergo the procedure accused cryonics organisations of preying on people at their most vulnerable.
"She died peacefully in the knowledge her body would be preserved in the way she wished." But her mother was so busy organising cryonics volunteers to prepare her body that the judge noted, "fully available" daughter on the day she died.
The judge said the girl had carried out internet research into cryonics during the last months of her life and there was no doubt that she had the mental capacity to launch legal action.
Call up one of the currently operational centers of cryonics. That's the industry-preferred term for the practice of freezing one's body after death in order to one day, once the necessary technology arrives, be thawed out and reanimated.
Fighting the emotion that threatened to paralyze him, he alerted the cryonics team waiting nearby and called the nurses to come pronounce her dead.