cryolesion

cryolesion

(kri'o-le?zhun)
1. The cooling of an area in order to injure or destroy it. Synonym: cryotherapy
2. A lesion produced by exposure to cold (e.g., frostbite).
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for Purchase of cryolesion therapy generator for cryoanalagesia
MT-I/II-knockout mice developed more severe brain injury accompanied by increased numbers of T cells in the injury site and circulating leukocytes and the decreased number of alternatively activated macrophages in the circulation after 7-day treatment with brain cryolesion. These observations indicate that MT-I/II may have a neuroprotective role via modulation of the immune response [57].
Abrahao et al., "Low-level laser therapy (808 nm) reduces inflammatory response and oxidative stress in rat tibialis anterior muscle after cryolesion," Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, vol.
These encouraging effects of LLLT on muscle metabolism formed the basis for the current in vivo study, which aimed to evaluate the biological response to laser irradiation in a model of cryolesion in rats.
Fraser, "An estimation of tissue damage and thermal history in the cryolesion," Cryobiology, vol.
Modern cryoprobes are typically energized by Joule-Thomson (JT) cycles; the use of a gas mixture working fluid, rather than a single component such as nitrogen, greatly increases the refrigeration capacity of the JT cycle [Brodyansky et al., 1971] and thus the size of the cryolesion produced by the cryoprobe.
Follow-up of renal masses after cryosurgery using computed tomography; enhancement patterns and cryolesion size.
Research today is focused on improving the cryosurgical planning tools that are used to optimize the placement of these probes, monitoring the formation of the cryolesion, increasing the rate of cooling that can be provided from each probe, and identifying chemical additives that make tumors more vulnerable to the freezing process.
Rojas et al., "Differential role of tumor necrosis factor receptors in mouse brain inflammatory responses in cryolesion brain injury," Journal of Neuroscience Research, vol.
Tenders are invited for Supply of Cryolesion Generator for Cryoanalgesia
An animal model based on a cryolesion in the parietal cortex of juvenile mice, which produces later cortical atrophy and cognitive decline reminiscent of that observed in schizophrenia, induces a lasting increase in the number of microglia in cingulate cortex and hippocampus, with accompanying neurodegeneration [67].
The cryolesion that is formed (Fredrickson 2004) is typically on the order of tens of millimeters in diameter and the lethal zone (i.e., the region in which cell death is complete) extends outward into the tissue from the cryoprobe tip approximately to the location where the tissue is about 240 K (-28 [degrees]F), although this will vary by [+ or -]15 K (27 [degrees]F) depending on the surgical details of the surgical procedure and location (Rubinsky 2000).