cryoglobulin


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cryoglobulin

 [kri″o-glob´u-lin]
a serum globulin (invariably an immunoglobulin) that precipitates at low temperature (e.g., 4°C) and redissolves at 37°C. Cryoglobulins are classified as Type I, monoclonal immunoglobulins; Type II, immune complexes involving monoclonal immunoglobulins with antibody activity against polyclonal immunoglobulins; or Type III, immune complexes involving polyclonal immunoglobulins (in most cases, these are globulin-antiglobulin immune complexes like Type II complexes). Types I and II occur in plasma cell dyscrasias and lymphoproliferative disorders as well as in asymptomatic “essential” cryoglobulinemia. Types II and III occur in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Sjögren's syndrome. Type III also occurs in a wide variety of infectious diseases.

cryoglobulin

/cryo·glob·u·lin/ (-glob´u-lin) an abnormal globulin that precipitates at low temperatures and redissolves at 37° C.

cryoglobulin

[krī′ōglob′yoo͡lin]
Etymology: Gk, kryos + L, globulus, small sphere
an abnormal plasma protein that precipitates and coalesces at low temperatures and dissolves and disperses at body temperature.

cryoglobulin

Hematology An abnormal protein–eg, polymeric IgG3, detected by cooling serum to 32ºC Found in Myeloma, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome, CLL, SLE. See Cryoglobulinemia.

Cryoglobulin

An abnormal blood protein associated with several diseases. It is characterized by its tendency to clump in cold temperatures.
Mentioned in: Cryoglobulin Test

cryoglobulin

an abnormal globulin that precipitates at low temperatures and redissolves at 98.6°F (37°C).
References in periodicals archive ?
They demonstrated an increase of kappa FLC serum levels in patients with mixed cryoglobulinemia, observing an abnormal FLC ratio in patients with MC vasculitis and B-NHL, with a significant correlation between elevated FLC ratios and cryoglobulin level and severe HCV-related B-NHL.
The cryoglobulin levels may vary from 50 [micro]g/mL to 100 [micro]g/mL to 5 mg/mL to 10 mg/mL or higher.
73,74) There is no definitive diagnostic substructure associated with all cryoglobulin deposits.
In their protocol for the investigation of cryoglobulins, the authors advocate the use of the "cryocrit" as a means of quantifying and typing the cryoglobulin in question.
Further laboratory testing is also done at admission, including a throat culture, cryoglobulin, hepatitis screen, antinuclear antibody (ANA), HIV, lupus anticoagulant, cardiolipin, herpes IgG, antithrombin III level, immune complex detection panel for Clq, and tissue transgluttin AB4 IgA.
It has been hypothesized that the association between cirrhosis and MC may be due to the association of cryoglobulin with longstanding HCV infection and older age.
The routine use of prewarmed blood collection equipment and serum separation at 37 C is recommended for cryoglobulin assay specimen collection by Moroz and Rose.
The following tests were negative or within the reference range in all HSP patients: thrombocyte count, prothrombin time (PT), active partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), C3, C4, antinuclear antibody (ANA), anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA), antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA and cANCA), cryoglobulin, bacterial cultures, and virus serology including hepatitis A, B, and C.
We requested further workup, including complement measurements [complement 3 (C3) and C4], serum protein electrophoresis, a cryoglobulin screen, and viral serology analysis (HIV, hepatitis B virus, HCV).