cryoglobulin


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cryoglobulin

 [kri″o-glob´u-lin]
a serum globulin (invariably an immunoglobulin) that precipitates at low temperature (e.g., 4°C) and redissolves at 37°C. Cryoglobulins are classified as Type I, monoclonal immunoglobulins; Type II, immune complexes involving monoclonal immunoglobulins with antibody activity against polyclonal immunoglobulins; or Type III, immune complexes involving polyclonal immunoglobulins (in most cases, these are globulin-antiglobulin immune complexes like Type II complexes). Types I and II occur in plasma cell dyscrasias and lymphoproliferative disorders as well as in asymptomatic “essential” cryoglobulinemia. Types II and III occur in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Sjögren's syndrome. Type III also occurs in a wide variety of infectious diseases.

cryoglobulin

Hematology An abnormal protein–eg, polymeric IgG3, detected by cooling serum to 32ºC Found in Myeloma, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome, CLL, SLE. See Cryoglobulinemia.

Cryoglobulin

An abnormal blood protein associated with several diseases. It is characterized by its tendency to clump in cold temperatures.
Mentioned in: Cryoglobulin Test
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, M-proteins, especially those that are also cryoglobulins, can precipitate and cause erroneous measurements via several methods (1).
This virus infects and provokes dysfunction in B-lymphocytes, which is primarily associated with the production of cryoglobulin, NOSA, and B-NHL.
Other tested parameters (anti-TG, anti-CCP, and cryoglobulin) were positive in 6-9 percent of cases (Table 3).
For the exclusion of other causes of peripheral neuropathy, subsidiary tests were conducted, including: full blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, fasting glucose and at 2 hours following 75 g of oral glucose; renal and hepatic function tests, TSH and free T4; B12 vitamin and homocystine; HIV and HTLV1 and 2, VDRL; cryoglobulin studies; serum protein electrophoresis; rheumatoid factor; anti-Ro (SS-A) and anti-Ro (SS-B).
(7,8) The paraprotein may also have autoantibody or cryoglobulin activity resulting in autoimmune phenomena or cryoglobulinemia.
The gelatinized and ablated proteins form cryoglobulin or cryogel.
A hypercoagulable workup (protein C, protein S, factor II mutation, antithrombin III level, lupus anticoagulant, MTHFR mutation, cryoglobulin, homocystine, cardiolipin antibody, lipoprotein (a), beta-2 glycoprotein) showed abnormality of Factor V Leiden with heterozygousity for R506Q polymorphism.
High-potency antihaemophilic factor concentrate prepared from cryoglobulin precipitate.
The cryoglobulin levels may vary from 50 [micro]g/mL to 100 [micro]g/mL to 5 mg/mL to 10 mg/mL or higher.