crutches


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crutches

 [kruch´ez]
artificial supports, made of wood or metal, used by those who need aid in walking because of injury, disease, or birth defect.
Types. Crutches are made in different sizes suitable for persons of various heights. Most are made of wood or tubular aluminum. The standard type is the tall crutch that fits under the armpit with double uprights and a small horizontal hand bar between them. The lower part may be adjustable to allow for extensions. There always should be a rubber tip at the base, preferably a suction tip, to prevent slipping.

Gaining in popularity is the Lofstrand crutch, which consists of a single tube of aluminum surmounted by a metal cuff that fits around the forearm. The user supports his weight on a handbar. He can release his hold on the handbar, as in grasping a handrail to climb stairs, without dropping the crutch. A variation of the Lofstrand crutch is the Canadian elbow extensor crutch, which goes farther up the arm.

In walking with crutches, the means of locomotion is transferred from the legs to the arms. The muscles of the arms, shoulders, back, and chest work together to manipulate the crutches. The kind of crutches used depends largely on the nature of the disability. In some cases, the legs may be partially able to function and bear some of the body's weight, so that there is less dependence on the crutches. In other cases, leg braces may be needed to supplement the crutches.
Gaits. The user is taught one of several standard methods or gaits, depending on the underlying condition. Eventually he or she should be able to master at least two gaits: a fast one for making speed in the open, and a slow one for crowded places, where the primary need is to maintain balance. A variety of gaits also helps to relieve fatigue because one set of muscles can rest while another works.

In describing a gait each foot and crutch is called a point, so that a two-point gait, for example, means that two points of the total of four are in contact with the ground during the performance of one step. A three-point gait may be used when one leg is stronger than the other, meaning that two crutches and the weaker leg hit the ground simultaneously while the next step is made by the stronger leg alone. There is also the so-called tripod gait, swinging gait, and variations of them.
Types of crutches.
 Crutch-walking gaits. Note that all gaits begin from the tripod position.
( and see also gait analysis.)

crutches

devices used to assist walking (by transferring some or all body weight away from leg or foot to upper limbs), provide stability when walking or standing (by widening base of support) or decrease plantar loading (by transferring an element of body weight to the support surface via crutch tip)
References in periodicals archive ?
Crutches can be handed in at A&E or at the hospital reception.
Once I was ready a helper would take the crutches away and I'd complete the swing.
However we need the crutches for other patients so we're asking people to come and hand them in at accident and emergency.
I think I threw my crutches down at one stage and then wondered how I would get them back.
The man on crutches is described as being of Asian appearance, 5ft 10in tall with short black hair.
I am meant to keep the crutches for two months because with this operation you want to make sure you get it right.
I took my crutches and smacked him over the head repeatedly, pushed him to the ground and ran out of the
We went to a fundraiser recently and there was another little boy who was looking to have the same surgery and Riccardo raiser recently and there was another little boy who was looking to have the same surgery and Rictook out his crutches to show him what could be achieved.
But one patient - who was given crutches after suffering a football injury - said: "It's crazy - I was told not to take them back to the hospital, so they're still in the back of my car because I don't know what to do with them.
He said: "We know that returning crutches is the last thing on anyone's mind when they're properly back on their feet again after breaking a leg or foot.
Grambart, who is a Fellow member of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, show that in some cases, ditching the crutches earlier may be a better option for patient recovery.
HEARTLANDS Hospital is appealing to local residents to return any disused crutches they have lying around the house so they can be used for other patients.