crust

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crust

 [krust]
a formed outer layer, especially an outer layer of solid matter formed by drying of a bodily exudate or secretion.
milk crust cradle cap.

crust

(krŭst),
1. A hard outer layer or covering; cutaneous crusts are often formed by dried serum or pus on the surface of a ruptured blister or pustule.
2. A scab.
Synonym(s): crusta
[L. crusta]

crust

(krust) a formed outer layer, especially of solid matter formed by drying of a bodily exudate or secretion.
milk crust  crusta lactea.

crust

(krŭst)
n.
An outer layer or coating formed by the drying of a bodily exudate such as pus or blood; a scab.
v. crusted, crusting, crusts
v.intr.
1. To become covered with a crust.
2. To harden into a crust.

crust′less adj.

crust

Etymology: L, crusta, shell
a solidified, hard outer layer formed by the drying of a body exudate, such as blood or pus, common in dermatological conditions such as eczema, impetigo, seborrhea, and favus and during the healing of burns and lesions; a scab. Also called crusta.
enlarge picture
Crust
Cosmetic surgery A patch of dried protein-rich material that oozes from a hair graft, which sloughs off in 1–3 wks
Dermatology A layer of dried serum from an open wound
Seismology The outer layer of the Earth’s surface

crust

(krŭst)
1. A hard outer layer or covering; cutaneous crusts are often formed by dried serum or pus on the surface of a ruptured blister or pustule.
2. A scab.
Synonym(s): crusta.
[L. crusta]

crust

(krŭst)
1. A hard outer layer or covering; cutaneous crusts are often formed by dried serum or pus on the surface of a ruptured blister or pustule.
2. A scab.
[L. crusta]

crust,

n a hard-coating surface layer composed of coagulated tissue fluid and blood products mixed with epithelial and inflammatory cells covering a lesion formed by the rupture of a bulla, vesicle, or pustule.

crust

a formed outer layer, especially an outer layer of solid matter formed by drying of a bodily exudate or secretion. It may be serocellular or hemorrhagic.

palisading crust
there are alternating layers of cellular debris and exudate; typical of fungal infections of the skin and dermatophilosis.
waxy crust
typical of exudative epidermitis.
References in classic literature ?
My dearest love,' said I, 'the crust well-earned -'
At a few minutes to seven," returned the duke (suiting the action to the words), "I raise the crust of the pie; I find in it two poniards, a ladder of rope, and a gag.
I eat when I can get it, and munch my crust when I can get no crumb; likewise, when there is no ale to be had I wash the dust from out my throat with a trickle of cold water.
If the crust is of sufficient thickness we shall come to a final stop between six and seven hundred miles beneath the earth's surface; but during the last hundred and fifty miles of our journey we shall be corpses.
The finding of the telegraph-instrument practically assured me that David Innes had driven Perry's iron mole back through the earth's crust to the buried world of Pellucidar; but what adventures had befallen him since his return?
Beeson spoke as if a sojourn in his warm cabin on such a night, as compared with walking fourteen miles up to the throat in snow with a cutting crust, would be an intolerable hardship.
A violent contraction of the lunar crust, while cooling, might suffice to imprint this gigantic star.
The central part is coarsely cellular, the cells decreasing in size towards the exterior; where there is a shell-like case about the third of an inch in thickness, of compact stone, which again is overlaid by the outside crust of finely cellular lava.
With it I intend to go around the world, to earn my crust of bread and cup of wine.
The emphasis was helped by the speaker's hair, which bristled on the skirts of his bald head, a plantation of firs to keep the wind from its shining surface, all covered with knobs, like the crust of a plum pie, as if the head had scarcely warehouse-room for the hard facts stored inside.
Then Gowan asserting his rights as a disappointed man who had his grudge against the family, and who, perhaps, had allowed his mother to have them there, as much in the hope it might give them some annoyance as with any other benevolent object, aired his pencil and his poverty ostentatiously before them, and told them he hoped in time to settle a crust of bread and cheese on his wife, and that he begged such of them as (more fortunate than himself) came in for any good thing, and could buy a picture, to please to remember the poor painter.
He had a crust of bread, a coarse shirt, and two pairs of stockings, in his bundle.