crush


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crush

(krŭsh),
1. To squeeze injuriously between two hard bodies.
2. A bruise or contusion from pressure between two solid bodies.
[O.Fr. cruisir]
References in classic literature ?
What was the good of digging if I must be suffocated, crushed by the water that was turning into stone?--a punishment that the ferocity of the savages even would not have invented!
if my Nautilus were strong enough to bear this pressure without being crushed!"
"I think," he answered, "that we shall not be crushed. We have no more suffocation to fear."
It broke it by backing and then rushing forward against the field, which gradually gave way; and at last, dashing suddenly against it, shot forwards on the ice-field, that crushed beneath its weight.
At this sudden outflame of wrath the two witnesses sank their faces on to their chests, and sat as men crushed. The Abbot turned his angry eyes away from them and bent them upon the accused, who met his searching gaze with a firm and composed face.
The boat itself was crushed and splintered against the schooner's side as it came inboard; but the wreck was securely lashed, for it could be patched and made whole again.
Wolf Larsen and I, between us, cut off Kerfoot's crushed finger and sewed up the stump.
Besides, she was so crushed, poor girl; she considered herself infinitely beneath me; how could she feel anger or resentment?
The thought, too, came into my overwrought brain that our parts now were completely changed, that she was now the heroine, while I was just a crushed and humiliated creature as she had been before me that night--four days before....
"It doesn't surprise me," said D'Artagnan, in a low tone to Porthos, "that Mazarin would have been much better satisfied had I crushed the life out of his councillor."
But when she took up the crushed letter and put it in her drawer, that she might lock it out of sight, hard smarting tears, having no relief in them as the great drops had that fell last night, forced their way into her eyes.
They then found that the Sawhorse had been badly dazed by the blow; for while the hard wooden knot of which his head was formed could not be crushed by the hammer, both his ears were broken off and he would be unable to hear a sound until some new ones were made for him.