crude mortality rate


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crude mortality rate

Epidemiology The mortality rate from all causes of death for a population
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Deaths from self-inflicted injuries, crude mortality rates per 100,000, estimates global totals, 2000-2015.
In Brazil, crude mortality rates for the country as a whole have remained basically stable since 1995 (external causes around 72.4 per 100 thousand) or 1998 (homicide/assault around 27.3).
To account for intrinsic variability related to random variation of deaths count, we assumed that [y.sup.S.sub.i] followed a Poisson distribution, with mean [[mu].sup.S.sub.i] equal to the product between person-years at risk and the crude mortality rate r,:
But recent reports from the camps, largely by way of Radio Dabanga, offer data suggesting that the Crude Mortality Rates (CMR) for both adults and children under five (U5) are well in excess of the emergency range.
Therefore, data from these areas, which collectively represent approximately 7.3% of the country's population (16), were only included in the calculation of the country's crude mortality rates and the CHI scores (i.e., they were not included in the calculation of age-adjusted mortality or avoidable deaths).
The mortality rate for Bosnia and Herzegovina estimated by averaging rates from neighboring countries was 8.0/100,000 (crude mortality rate 11.1/100,000) (7).
The crude mortality rate for motor vehicle-related deaths dropped from 14.92 in 2000 to 11.23 in 2009, while the suicide rate rose from 10.43 to 12.02.
However, crude mortality rate is declining in the Ethiopian and Kenyan
Record levels of acute malnutrition have been registered there, with 58 per cent of children under the age of five acutely malnourished, with a crude mortality rate of more than two deaths per 10,000 per day.
defines famine as at least 20 percent of households facing extreme food shortages, a crude mortality rate of more than two people per 10,000 per day and malnutrition rates of above 30 percent.
The presence of a positive enterococcal isolate was associated with a higher overall crude mortality rate than in patients with no isolates positive for Enterococcus.