cruciform


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Related to cruciform: Cruciform ligament

cruciform

(kroo′sĭ-form) [L. crux, cross, + forma, shape]
Shaped like a cross.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hot cross bun sign refers to the cruciform shaped pontine T2 hyperintensity in multiple system atrophy due to selective loss of myelinated transverse pontocerebellar fibers and neurons in the pontine raphe and sparing of the pontine tagmentum and corticospinal tracts.3,6 Though hot cross bun sign is seen often in MSA, it is not pathognomonic but only a supportive sign on clinical background.7
While conventional compression members including W-shapes are typically limited by flexural (Euler) buckling about the local weak axis of bending, cruciform members in combined compression and bending are typically limited by torsional buckling.
Corresponding to these two issues, the experimental techniques of biaxial tension are first investigated in the present paper, including design of biaxial tension system and optimization of cruciform specimen.
First, Sprinkle concedes that in the Old Testament "God sanctions specific wars to protect His living room" (104); yet, he later argues, "Nonviolence sinks its roots deep into the narrative of a cruciform God, which stretches from a garden to a manger, a manger to a cross.
He said that this discovery has made from a Cruciform stupa with chapels on its eastern side facing towards west.
One excavation revealed remnants of a third-century church with a cruciform baptismal structure where early pilgrims came to be baptized.
The pallet is available as both a classic three-runner pallet and as a cruciform perimeter-based pallet for secure block stacking.
B.-a seal that Bach had used since the early 1720s, and one that is replete with cruciform patterns that result from the mirroring of the initials.
and lung-filled passion down, the spiral cruciform...
the ecclesia crucis becomes the locus--the space--in which communities of practice arise by designing opportunities for learning through a cruciform catechesis" (75).
The latest in this ongoing series of collections from the Oxford School of Archaeology includes several narrowly focused papers, concentrating on specific items, such as a gold band inscribed with a biblical text, cruciform brooches and Middle Saxon worked bone items.