cruciferous vegetable


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

cruciferous vegetable

Nutrition
Any of a family of indole-rich vegetables (e.g., broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower and mustard), which have anti-tumour-promoting activity in laboratory animals; colon cancer is associated with decreased consumption of cruciferous vegetables.

cruciferous vegetable

A family of vegetables (including broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, and cauliflower) named for their cross-shaped flowers. People who eat a diet rich in these vegetables are found to have a decreased incidence of cardiovascular diseases, strokes, and cancer, among other illnesses.
See also: vegetable
References in periodicals archive ?
'Still, dietary guidelines should highlight the importance of increasing consumption of cruciferous vegetables for protection from vascular disease,' Blekkenhorst said
Shred 12 cups of cruciferous vegetables (consider equal parts of broccoli, red cabbage, and white cabbage), with perhaps some carrots.
Previous studies of people with bladder, prostate, breast and gut cancers have found that eating four to seven or more servings of cruciferous vegetables a week can prevent the growth of these cancers by 50 percent.
Drink a lot of fluid, eat a lot of cruciferous vegetables, and don't smoke cigarettes.
Nechuta noted that cruciferous vegetable consumption habits differ between China and the United States and suggested this fact be considered when generalizing these results to U.S.
For decades, scientists have known that the nutrients in cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, and kale offer unique protection against the type of DNA damage that too often results in malignancies.
Thus, a single serving of a complete cruciferous vegetable supplement can protect reproductive tissues from a whole array of harmful hormonal influences, potentially making you much less likely to develop these devastating malignancies.
Laboratory studies show that a natural compound in cruciferous vegetables induces the death of cancer cells.
Isothiocyanates (ITC), derived from glucosinolates, are thought to be responsible for the chemoprotective actions conferred by higher cruciferous vegetable intake.
Among smokers, the protective effect of cruciferous vegetable intake ranged from a 20 percent reduction in risk to a 55 percent reduction in risk depending on the type of vegetable consumed and the duration and intensity of smoking.
The Bottom Line: If you're not a cruciferous vegetable lover (and our guess is that there are a lot of you out there), you might want to give Brassica Tea a try.
Italian scientists compared cruciferous vegetable intake, including cauliflower, among individuals with and without several common cancers.