crucifer


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crucifer

(kro͞o′sə-fər)
n.
1. One who bears a cross in a religious procession.
2. A plant in the mustard family.

cru·cif′er·ous (-sĭf′ər-əs) adj.

crucifer

a member of the family Cruciferae, consisting of annual to perennial herbs, which are rarely wood and have flowers with four equal petals arranged crosswise; examples are the brassicas, mustards, shepherd's purse.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most research on crucifers has focused on broccoli, Brassica oleracea (both vegetable and sprouts), as a source of bioactive compounds with nutrigenomic potential.
In the Proceedings of the fourth International Workshop : The Management of Diamondback Moth and other Crucifer Pests, 26-29.
alisalensis causes a disease known as "bacterial blight of crucifers.
Plasticity of aggressive signaling and its evolution in male spring peepers, Pseudacris crucifer.
The performance singers included the following: Amanda Quist as Mary Magdalen, Debra Netz as Mary Major, Dixie Edwards as angel with lance, Walter Ogston as crucifer, Katie Rohwer as Mary Jacobi, Chris Kohler as St.
Broccoli belongs to the crucifer family of plants which also includes the brassicas cabbage, cauliflower and sprouts, as well as the closely related Chinese cabbage and turnips.
For those who don't take their church that High, the boat boy is the acolyte who carries the incense, accompanying the thurifer, who wields the incense-burning censer, alongside other acolytes such as the crucifer and the bell ringer.
Starter crucifer seedlings, as opposed to seeds that might not sprout, are a good way to go.
Oddly enough though, he had played Dr Watson to Charlton Heston's Sherlock Holmes in the 1980 Los Angeles production of the play The Crucifer of Blood.
Among the topics are chloroplast genomes, reticulate evolution, crucifer evolution in the post-genomic era, the evolution of the flower, diversity in secondary metabolism, the ecological importance of species diversity, and genomic diversity in nature and domestication.