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crus

 [krus] (pl. cru´ra) (L.)
1. leg (def. 1).
2. a leglike part.
crus ce´rebri basis pedunculi cerebri.
crus of clitoris the continuation of the corpus cavernosum of the clitoris, diverging posteriorly to be attached to the pubic arch.
crura of diaphragm two fibroelastic bands that arise from the lumbar vertebrae and insert into the central tendon of the diaphragm.
crura of fornix two flattened bands of white matter that unite to form the body of the fornix of the cerebrum.
crus of penis the continuation of each corpus cavernosum of the penis, diverging posteriorly to be attached to the pubic arch.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

crus

, gen.

cru·ris

, pl.

cru·ra

(krūs, kroo'ris, -ră), [TA] Do not confuse this word with crux.
1.
See also: limb. Synonym(s): leg
2. Any anatomic structure resembling a leg; usually (in the plural) a pair of diverging bands or elongated masses.
See also: limb.
[L.]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

crus

(kro͞os, krŭs)
n. pl. crura (kro͝or′ə)
1. The section of the leg or hind limb between the knee and foot; shank.
2.
a. A leglike part.
b. A body part consisting of elongated masses or diverging bands that resemble legs or roots.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

crus

, gen. cruris (krūs, krūr'is) [TA]
1. Synonym(s): leg.
2. Any anatomic structure resembling a leg; usually (in the plural) a pair of diverging bands or elongated masses.
See also: limb
[L.]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

crus

Any leg-like structure.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
To characterize smoking-associated differential methylation, we analyzed RRBS data from MESA and CRU samples using a DMR identification algorithm adapted from previous studies (Boyle et al.
CRU employs over 250 experts and has more than 10 offices around the world, in Europe, the Americas, China, Asia and Australia - our office in Beijing opened in 2004.
The KMF Grand Cru is described as a "unique brew unlike anything the [Samuel Adams brewers] have barrel-aged before ...
"CRU's World Aluminium Conference is valued for bringing together some of the key decision makers from around the world leading to many business opportunities," remarked Al Baqali.
Tabela 1--Restrigoes medias diarias dos cenarios de Janeiro e Julho de 2011 quanto ao volume e componentes do leite cru integral captado pelo laticinio Janeiro Julho Volume, L 8.206,51 4.172,03 Gordura, % 3,12 3,54 Proteina, % 3,19 3,29 Caseina, % 2,50 2,53 Lactose, % 4,53 4,42
Some of them are often better than the less dynamic members of the Grand Cru Classe club.
Dominic Halahan of CRU says: "A unique opportunity to discuss 'above the ground' mining business risks and their interrelationship.
Yet, for a few pounds more, one can invest in a cru, one of the top 10 villages which each have their own identity and style.
Figure 1: English pseudo-plurals: Noun A DIVE 'the act of diving' PE 'a Hebrew letter' SPECIE 'money in coin' TAP 'a light rap' TAW 'a marble' TOOT 'a blast on a wind instrument' YAW 'an angular displacement' Noun B DIVES 'a rich man' PES 'part of the hind limb of a vertebrate' SPECIES 'a category of biological classification' TAPS 'a bugle call' TAWS 'a whip' ROOTS 'a woman, girl' YAWS 'an infectious disease' Figure 2: English quasi-pseudo-plurals: Noun A ALA 'a Sumerian drum' BU 'a Japanese coin' CRU 'a French vineyard' DA 'Brit.
In one of the many "Climategate" e-mails, for instance, Ian "Harry" Harris, the CRU programmer, lamented about the "hopeless state of their (CRU) database.
London, Apr 15(ANI): An inquiry panel of leading scientists, nominated by the Royal Society, has said the University of East Anglia's Climatic Research Unit (CRU), which is involved in the row over stolen e-mails, acted with integrity and made no attempt to manipulate their research on global temperatures.